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Archive for January, 2011

ラーメン on Holiday

Posted by Heliocentrism on January 16, 2011

December 29-31, 2010

All Pictures

Cheesecake and coffee

No ramen

One thing I really wanted to do while in Osaka was to visit the Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum. But, alas, I was not able to go. The museum was closed for the holidays.

Instead we went to the Floating Garden Observatory downtown. I have no idea why they picked this name. Nothing floats, and there is no garden; not even a solitary flower. There is, however, a great view of Osaka.

We walked around up there until it was time to watch the sunset. Then we went inside to stare down on the city while sipping hot chocolate. We sat there for a couple hours. Then it was time to say goodbye to Makeeya.

She was heading north to Tokyo and my mom, Alex, and I would spend the night in Osaka. The next day we would take an overnight boat back to Beppu in my prefecture.

Good old underground shopping

It’s too cold to be outside

The next day we were to travel to different tourist spots in the city, but it was cold and rainy. We decided instead, to stick to things near the Umeda train station. We rode on the ferris wheel at the HEP Five then explored the neighborhood.

We just walked to what ever caught our eye. There were so many sights and sounds. We managed to find a huge underground shopping mall that seems to link many of the train stations together. There was a lovely underground fountain and everything!

our sleeping area on the ferry

Did you see the sauna? Yes, but it was filled with naked old men.

There is no direct train back to Oita. To return by train we would have to transfer at least once in Fukuoka in the middle of the night. Plus we’ve already traveled by train in Japan, so I wanted something new for my mom and nephew.

The boat from Osaka to Beppu was my choice. Just get on the boat and go to sleep. When you wake up, you’re there. We got the cheapest tickets available because that was all that was left.

If the next class up isn’t too much more expensive next time I would take that, but the class we had wasn’t too bad. It wasn’t cold, noisy, or uncomfortable. It was okay.

Goodbye Osaka!

The boat had everything. There was a restaurant, vending machines, a store, a spa, and many slot machines. I didn’t venture into the ladies’ spa, but Alex went into the men’s. He didn’t stay long.

We sat by a window and watched Osaka disappear into the darkness. We ate the dinner we brought at the Lawson’s at the port. Alex explored the boat and one by one we all headed to bed.

In the middle of the night one of our neighbors had the great idea of rearranging all the stuff he kept in a series of paper bags. He kept taking things out then putting them back. I woke up to find many heads popping up and looking around to see what was going on.

At first I thought there was a badger in the room or some other trash rummaging rodent. There was a drop of relief to find out that it was just a young man in white skinny jeans trying to organize his clutter. Then I wished he would put that paper bag over his head and go back to sleep. Eventually he did; with his head uncovered.

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your bank toaskwhatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan. I’ve never been a tourist.)

CaminoRo

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 34°44’20.2″N 135°29’17.2″E

The nearest subway station is Mikuni Station.

Address:

2F/3F 2-6-7 Nishimikuni
Yodogawa-ku, Osaka City 532-0006 JAPAN

Phone:

  • 06-6398-7313 (in Japan)
  • +81-6-6398-7313 (international)

Website:

e-mail: guesthouse@caminoro.com

Cost

Notes:

This hostel is run by a very nice couple with a baby. They really went out of there way to help us in any way they could.


The Umeda Sky Building
(梅田スカイビル)
(Umeda Sukai Biru)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 34°42’18.5″N 135°29’26.0″E

Address:

1-1-88 Oyodo-naka,
Kita-ku Osaka, Osaka Prefecture
531-0076 Japan

Phone:

  • 06-6440-3855

Websites:

Cost:

  • 700YEN,
  • but if you visit the cinema in the other building you can get a flier with a 70YEN discount/ person.
  • You only need one flier per group to get a discount for each person.

Hours:

  • 10:00 – 22:30
  • (Last admittance is at 22:00)

Notes:

  • The “Floating Garden Observatory” is on the 39th floor.
  • Be sure to visit the old time Osaka town on the first basement level (B1) of the building. It’s free to view.
  • There are many restaurants.
  • There are lockers near the elevator to the top. They cost 100YEN to use.
  • I recommend going about  15 minutes before sunset.

Hep Five

How to get there:

Address:

5-15 Kakudacho, Kita-ku
Hep Five Mall Osaka, Osaka Prefecture
Japan

Phone:

  • +81 6-6313-0501

Website

Download:

Cost:

  • Ferris Wheel – 500YEN/person

Hours:

  • Stores – 11:00 – 21:00
  • Restaurants – 11:00 – 23:30
  • others – 11:00 – 23:00

The Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum
(インスタントラーメン発明記念館)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 34°49’05.2″N 135°25’36.2″E
  • Go to Ikeda Station
  • Go through the south exit.
  • Turn left and follow the signs to the museum.
  • It’s a 5 minute walk.

Address:

8-25 Masumi-cho,
Ikeda-shi, Osaka
〒563-0041 Japan

Phone:

  • 072-751-0825

Website

Download:

Cost:

  • Free
  • Ramen class is 500YEN/Adult and 300YEN/Kid

Hours:

  • Wed – Sun 9:30 – 16:00
  • Allow 90 mintues to view all the exhibits and another 90 minutes to make ramen.

Books:

Notes:

  • In order to take part in the ramen making class, you must have a reservation.
  •  For reservations – Call 072-751-0825 any time between 10:00 – 16:00 Wednesday through Sunday.

Boat to Beppu
(Sunflower)

How to get there:

  • 34°38’16.3″N 135°24’44.5″E

From Osaka –

Website:

Cost:

  • 9,700YEN/ person For the open room
  • List

Hours:

  • Leaves Osaka at 19:05
  • gets to Beppu around 7:00.

Notes:

  • There is a Lawson’s right after you check-in to the ferry terminal, but before you get on the boat.
  • There is also a convenience store on the boat along with a restaurant and tons of vending machines.
    • There are many hot water stations where you can get hot water for tea, ramen, and whatever you want hot water for.
  • The website is in Japanese, so it might be easier to buy your tickets from a travel agency.
    • There is a travel agency and just about every major JR station.
  • There is a women only open  room.
  • You ca bring your car on this ferry.

Map:

Posted in Honshū, Japan, Osaka 市, Osaka 府 | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Capsulation

Posted by Heliocentrism on January 14, 2011

December 28-29, 2010

All Pictures

inside the temple

We went to a beautiful temple and walked through an interesting market, but so what?

Of course, since this was Japan and it was near New Year’s day, we went to a beautiful temple and walked through an interesting market, but so what? After living in Asia for 5 years, I stopped caring about that sort of thing. I just went there for the sake of Alex and my mom. To me the exciting activity for the day was checking in to a capsule hotel!

checking in

There are mostly just for men, so when Makeeya and I read online that there was one in Kyoto that offered accommodations for both males and females we jumped at the chance. Yes, they cost less than a normal hotel in Japan when traveling with 4 people, but it wasn’t just about saving money here. It was an opportunity to experience the quirky part of Japanese culture.

the women’s elevator

Except for the first floor lobby, everything is segregated by gender, even the elevators. The women’s elevator only goes to the ladies’ floors. There is a bathroom floor where the lockers, bathrooms, showers, and hot tub are. There were 2 floors of capsule rooms for women and 4 for men.

the showers

Everything was clean, well labeled, and small. It didn’t matter that I could not read or speak Japanese. Everything I needed had a picture label. I did have a hard time getting all my stuff to fit into the locker. But if it didn’t fit I could have put my stuff in a locker at the reception.

in my pod and 9h pajamas

The pod in which I slept was not too tiny. I had no problem sitting up in it. There was a shade I pulled down for privacy when I was ready to sleep.  I didn’t hear anyone snoring until I got out of the pod. The pod kept out most of the noise. The only time I heard people talking was when they stood right in front of my pod.

I must say that now, I prefer capsule hotels to hostels!

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your bank to askwhatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan. I’ve never been a tourist.)

Kyoto JR Station
(京都駅)

How to get there:

  • 34°59’07.5″N 135°45’34.7″E

You can get to Kyoto station by subway. It has the station code K11.

Websites:

Downloads:

Hours:

  • Most shops and restaurants open around 10:00 and close around 20:00.

Notes:

  • There are many lockers at this station.
  • You can go to the top of the station where you will have a great view of the city.

Higashi Honganji
(東本願寺)

How to get there:

  • 34°59’27.9″N 135°45’30.2″E

From Kyoto Station –

  • Take the North exit near the taxi stand.
  • Walk straight f0r 2 blocks down Karasuma-Dori.
  • It will be on your right.

Website

Cost:

  • Free

Hours:

  • Mar – Oct — 5:50 to 17:30
  • Nov – Feb –6:20 to 16:30

Notes:

It’s a 10 minute walk from Kyoto Station


Nishiki Market
(錦市場)

How to get there:

  • 35°00’20.1″N 135°45’57.0″E
  • You can go to Shijo Station on the Karasuma Subway Line

or

The market is one block north of Shijo Avenue and runs parallel to it.

Website:

Hours:

  • around 11:00 – 18:00 (individual shops vary)

Notes:

It gets very crowded at night, so you might not want to bring a big backpack here.


9 Hours
(ナインアワーズ 京都店)

How to get there:

It’s a 2 minute walk from Hankyu Kawaramachi Station.

Address:

9h ナインアワーズ 京都寺町 〒600-8031
京都市下京区寺町通 四条下ル貞安前町588

Phone:

  • 075-356-9005

Website:

e-mail: contact@9hours.jp

Cost:

  • for 9 hours ~ 3,000YEN
  • for 17 hours ~ 4,000YEN

Notes:

  • They provide towels, 1 packet each of shampoo, condition, and body wash, and pajamas.
  • If the pajamas do not fit you can ask for a larger or smaller size. They have S, M, L, XL, and XXL.

Map:



Posted in Honshū, Japan, Kyoto 市, Kyoto 府 | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Peace

Posted by Heliocentrism on January 14, 2011

December 27-28, 2010

All Pictures

Off to catch a bus to Hiroshima

The backpacking rookie

This was my nephew’s first time going on any type of backpacking trip. Though it was a very short trip, it was still fun seeing him experiencing Japan. I think he enjoyed it because he kept running off the take pictures of stuff or to ask questions of passers by.

Alex taking a photo of the sea

The trip started out with us not knowing where the bus stop was. I knew which block the stop was on, but I didn’t know the exact location. Makeeya got a guy working at a nearby Starbucks to help us. We found it with plenty of time to catch the bus.

exploring the ferry

We knew the departure and arrival time, but everything else was a mystery to be discovered along the way. When we stopped somewhere near Bungo-Takada for what I thought was a rest stop. We were actually waiting to board a ferry.

The sea was rough and if I had looked out at the waves I could have made myself seasick. I went up stairs where the padded seat were and laid out to sleep. I could almost pretend that I was a baby being rocked to sleep by an overly aggressive mother.

Alex watching his okonomiyaki dinner being made

It was night by the time we got to our hostel in Hiroshima. We had to leave for Kyoto at noon the next day, so we wanted to wake up early to see the sights. We decided to get something to eat then go to bed early.

Hiroshima-Style Okonomiyaki

Grape ≠ Grapefruit

The lady at the front desk recommended an restaurant a few blocks away from the hostel and gave us a map. It was pretty easy to find.

No one there spoke English, but fortunately they had an English menu. It had all the dishes written in both English and Japanese. We picked what we wanted to order and pointed to it. The waitress would then look at the corresponding Japanese translation. It’s a great system.

But there was a mis-translation in the drinks section. We all ordered the pomegranate-grape drink on the menu, only to be given grapefruit juice. We tried to explain to them what happened, but there was no use. I ordered Calpis instead.

Ok, the name is horrible, but the drink itself is divine!

Alex is ready to eat.

I’m a vegetarian who doesn’t eat chicken.

My mom is a vegetarian which makes eating in Asia a bit of a challenge. In most Asian countries the people do not eat a lot of meat, but there is a little meat in everything, even the kim chee has prawns in it.

I am not a vegetarian, but many of my friends who are, have told me how hard it is to eat in most restaurants in Asia. When they ask what dishes have no meat the waitors usually recommends a chicken or seafood dish. The concept of not eating anything that has ever had a mother is complete baffling to many Asians. This is why many western vegetarians living in Asia quickly fall in love with some India/ Nepali restaurant near their apartment.

So before we went to the restaurant I, on my mom’s behalf, ask the hostel receptionist to write a note to the waitress. I asked that the paper say that my mom was vegetarian and will not eat chicken, fish, beef, pork,… Even with the paper, we still had trouble ordering my mom’s food. They read the paper and thought, “This must be a mistake. How is this even possible?”

wow tatami…

Just like my home

We took a Japanese-style family room in the hostel. This meant that we would sleep on futons placed on the floor. The gang was delighted to try out sleeping in a traditional Japanese way until I told them that the accommodations would have them sleeping in the same fashion as they had been sleeping at my place. The only difference would be that now the sheets match.

The A-bomb detonated above this building

Now we just want peace.

The next day we went to the area of Hiroshima where the first atomic bomb was dropped.

While on Christmas break during grad-school in England, I visited my sister in D.C. She took me to the section of the Air and Space Museum at the Dulles Airport. They had the Enola Gay on display. In case you don’t know, that is the plane that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima.

I walked up to it and touched it. It was cold. It didn’t look scary like one would expect something that had killed so many people in such a short time would. It looked goofy and awkward as if it were hiding it’s true nature.

I wondered how Enola Gay, the mother of the pilot, felt when she heard about her namesake. Did it bother her? Did she wonder what on earth was her son thinking? How would I feel if someone named a bomb dropping plane after me?

A picture from museum of bodies in the river after the bomb dropped

It is a somber place. I don’t have to tell you how I felt walking around Peace Park in Hiroshima; you can imagine it for yourself.

I was surprised at how things were portrayed. I’ve visited many war memorials and monuments dedicated to fallen soldiers and civilians. There is usually some finger pointing that shows though. This one places no blame on anything other than the war. To me it said that it doesn’t matter who was right or who was wrong, having an atomic bomb dropped on your city for whatever reason, justified or not, is not a good thing for anybody and that peace should be more valued by every country.

All Pictures


 

Hiroshima
(広島市)
by bus

How to get there:

The bus stop for this bus is across the street from the Tokiwa near Oita Station, in front of the Forus.

Website:

Cost:

  • Oita to Hiroshima – 5,700YEN or
  • 4,750YEN with a group discount

Hours:

  • Bus leaves Oita at 10:09 and gets to Hiroshima at 16:12

Notes:

  • There is a bathroom on the bus.
  • The ticket for this bus ride includes a boat ride from Kyushu to Honshu. But you can buy tickets for the boat alone.

K’s House

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 34°23’33.0″N 132°28’25.7″E

The nearest Station is Hiroshima Station.

Address:

1-8-9, Matoba-cho,
Minami-ku, Hiroshima city,
Japan 732-0824

Phone:

  • +(81)-82-568-7244

Website:

e-mail: hiroshima@kshouse.jp

Cost:

  • Depends on the room, but Dorm rooms are 2,500YEN/ night.

Hours:

  • the doors are lock after a certain hour. I don’t remember what time.

Notes:

  • No free parking, but there is paid parking nearby. Ask about the cheaper weekend parking areas.

Hiroshima Peace Park
(広島平和記念公園)

How to get there:

  • 34°23’34.1″N 132°27’08.1″E
  • Take the tram #2, 3, 6 or 7 to Atomic Bomb Dome (Genbaku Dome-Mae)
  • This will put you right in front of the dome.
  • From there you can cross the bridge and head south to see the park, the museums, and other monuments.

Address:

  • Memorial Hall

1-6 Nakajima-cho,
Naka-ku, Hiroshima City
(in the Peace Memorial Park)

広島市中区中島町1番6号(広島平和記念公園内)

  • Peace Museum

Peace Memorial Museum
1-2 Nakajimama-cho,
Naka-ku, Hiroshima City
730-0811, Japan

Peace Memorial Museum
広島平和記念資料館 啓発担当
住所:広島市中区中島町1-2

Website

Cost:

  • Most are free.
  • The Peace Museum cost 50Yen to enter.

Hours:

  • The park is always open.
  • The museum and hall’s times are 8:30 – 17:00.
Videos:

Maps:



Posted in Hiroshima 県, Hiroshima 市, Honshū, Japan | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Slip Sliding Away

Posted by Heliocentrism on January 8, 2011

December 25, 2010

All Pictures

My mom handing out gifts

Merry Christmas!!

The day started out fantastically. My mom and nephew where visiting from Ohio to spend the holidays with me. My friend, Makeeya, who now lives in Korea was visiting too.

I met Makeeya in D.C. when we both played Basketball for Columbia Union College. She has since visited me in the UK and lived in South Korea during my last year there.

We all woke up that morning and handed out our gifts. No one bothered to wrap any of their presents. We just gave them out in the bags they came in or some other random bag.

That can’t be good.

Slip Siding Away

The plan was to drive to Kokonoe town and walk across the really high suspension bridge there. We figured that it would be really cold and windy along the bridge so we would stop off at an onsen in the the area to warm up before heading home. It was supposed to be a great day.

Things started to take a turn for the worse when we pass the car in the picture above. Sure we were driving on snow, but I used to live in Columbus, Ohio so winter driving was not an entirely new thing for me. As long as I drove slowly and carefully I thought that everything would be fine.

I stopped the see if the people from the car were okay.

“Daijoubu des ka?” (Are you Ok?)

“Hai, Daijoubu des!” (Yes. We’re ok!)

I then pressed the gas peddle to continue up the mountain, but then my k-car would only move a little. There wasn’t much traction, but we kept going. Cars that were heavier and had more horsepower zipped by us.

The old couple

We came upon an old couple in a silver station wagon that was having the same difficulties we were. We all watched as it slid off the road and hit the guard rail. We decided not to go around it in case they started to slide again and hit us. That was when I realized that we were stuck once more.

He just came over to tell us that there was nothing he could do. “Good Luck!”

My nephew, Alex, got out and helped the  older couple by pushing their car towards the middle of the road where there was less snow and ice. Meanwhile a police officer stopped to see what was going on.

I talked it over with Makeeya and Alex and we decided that we should turn around. Well, Alex didn’t want to go back, but he’s just a kid. What he wanted didn’t count at that moment.

Let’s all just leave our cars in the middle of the road. What’s the worst that could happen?

Alex and Makeeya started to push my car towards the middle of the road. Just then a van coming up the hill slid towards my car and stopped, partly blocking off the road. I didn’t want t0 drive by the van and chance hitting it. We waited for the van to leave.

The driver of the van started to put chains on his tires. The van would not be moving any time soon. We waited.

Good thing that guardrail is there.

We stood around discussing how long we would have to wait until the van moved. Then we saw a group of buses headed down the mountain. There were three of them.

The first one drove pass us, the cop, and the van with no problems. The second bus seemed like it was doing the same. The third looked like it was in a hurry, trying to over take the second bus.

We all stood there in horror as we realized what was really going on. It was not trying to over take anyone. It was out of control. It slammed into the guardrail and slid towards my car.

Everyone is rear ending everyone!

It did not hit my car, but it came too close for my comfort. I asked to police officer if he thought it was possible for me to just push my car down the hill. He seem unwilling to give me a definite answer. But I didn’t care anymore, I had to get my nephew and my car off this killer mountain!

Since my car was just a tiny k-car I had Makeeya and Alex walk along side the car as I drove slowly down the mountain. Whenever it started to slide they would grab the car and stop it. That’s one good thing about drive a non-powerful, light-as-feather car!

Almost hit that bus

Everything was going great… well, great after a few “almost sliding off the side of the road into a ditch” episodes. But we worked out a system of slow driving. When we came to a section of the road with deep ditches and no guard rails everyone would get out and walk the car as I drove very slowly.

This worked, until I almost hit a bus. There were many cars parked on the side of the road so I slowly pressed the brakes only the find that nothing happened. I tried steering the car away from the bus, but nothing happened. The car wanted to hit the bus. Luckily my car stopped about 5 feet in front of the bus.  We then pushed the car off the road so that it would be out of the way.

Like before, the number of cars sliding off the road hitting the guard rail and hitting other cars increased the longer we stayed. We wanted off the mountain! We might get hit on the way down, but we would definitely get hit if we stayed there. We continued with our descent.

We slowly drove down the mountain, pulling over every now and then to let faster cars go by. When we got to the bottom of the mountain we saw three of these cars in a pile up. I drove by them, as the drivers were getting each other’s insurance information, without a scratch on my car.

Safely off the icy roads and in a hot tub

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your bank to askwhatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan. I’ve never been a tourist.)

Kokonoe
(九重町)

How to get there:

By car –

  • Take route 210 or the Oita Expressway (toll road).

Websites:

Notes:

  • Be careful when driving in this town in winter.
  • Check the weather forecast before leaving your house.
  • If you do drive to Kokonoe when there is a lot of snow on the ground make sure to drive slowly, put chains on your tires, and watch out for crazy drivers who feel that they do not have to drive carefully in snow because they own SUV’s.

Kokonoe Yume Otsurihashi
 (九重“夢”大吊橋)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 33°10’25.9″N 131°13’36.4″E

By car –

  • Take route 210 toward Kokonow.
  • Then take either route 11 or route 40.
  • Look out for signs to the bridge.

Address:

1208 Tano Kokonoe Ōaza
Kusu-gun, Oita Prefecture

大分県玖珠郡九重町大字田野1208番地

Phone:

  • 0973-73-3800

Websites:

Download:

Cost:

  • Adult – 500YEN
  • Kids – 200YEN

Hours:

  • Jan – Jun 8:30 – 16:30
  • Jul – Oct 8:30 – 17:30
  • Nov – Dec 8:30 – 16:00
  • Close Dec 31.

Notes:

Parking is free.


Frog Hot Spring
(中川温泉蛙乃湯)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 33°14’32.4″N 131°19’51.0″E

By Car –

  • Take route 210 to Yufu City.
  • There is a place where route 210 and route 11 intersect near Minami Yufu Station. Turn here and take the very first left.
  • (Do not pass the rail road tracks.)
  • The spa is on your left shortly after the turn.

Address:

1176-1 Nakagawa Yufuinchō
Yufu City, Oita Prefecture

住所:大分県大分郡湯布院町中川1176-1

Phone:

  • 0977-85-4460

Website:

Cost:

  • 300YEN/ person or
  • 2,100YEN/ room

Hours:

  • 9:00 – 20:00

Notes:

no one here speaks English.

Maps:

Posted in Japan, Kokonoe 町, Kyūshū, Oita 県, Yufu 市 | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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