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Archive for the ‘Greece’ Category

Travel Tips for Greece

Posted by Heliocentrism on April 10, 2018

2017

You have to bring:

  • Just your prescription medication and a doctor’s note.
  • Everything else can be bought here.

Things you can buy here or bring with you:

  1. Luggage:
    • You can use a suitcase or a backpack. A Backpack gives you a little more mobility, but it’s not a must-have here.
  2. Clothes:
    • You can buy anything here.
  3. Towel:
    • Bring your towel if you are staying in a hostel.
  4. Shampoo, conditioner, and body wash:
    • All hotels provided guests with shampoo and body wash.
    • You are sometimes given conditioner.
    • You should bring your own toiletries if you are staying at a hostel.
      • You can buy shampoo, conditioner, and body wash at any convenience store or grocery store.
  5. Deodorant/ Antiperspirant:
    • You can find this here.
  6. Sunscreen:
    • No problem; you can find it here.
  7. Over the counter medicine:
    • There are lots of pharmacies where you can buy cold medicine and pain killers like aspirin.
    • It’s best if you know the generic or chemical name of the drugs you need.
      • Instead of asking for Bufferine, ask for ibuprofen.
    • I would still bring some medications for basic illnesses like diarrhea, fever, and constipation.
      • Don’t run out of these.
      • It’s always tough to look for medication when you’re already sick.
      • It’s easy to find what you want if you have a label of the drug you are looking for.
  8. Other things you should bring:
    • Hat
    • Sunglasses
    • Flip-flips
    • Smartphone
    • Comfortable shoes preferably hiking shoes
      • Sometimes the streets are literally stones stuck together. It can be hard to walk on with the wrong type of shoes.

the road in Rhodes

General Tips:

Toilet:

  • Don’t flush the toilet paper.
    • You’re suppose to throw it in the bin.
    • A free toilet can be hard to come by. Use the WC at museums and restaurants before you leave.
      • Assuming you are a customer.
    • You will find many paid toilets, but those tend to be not so clean.

Food:

  • Grocery Stores:
    • Sklavenitis (ΣΚΛΑΒΕΝΙΤΗΣ) is cheap, but AB is so much nicer.
    • There is also Carrefour.
  • Try gyros
  • Try bakklava
  • Try all the pastries, sweet and savory…
  • Try the cheeses


Combo Tickets:

  • Combo tickets in Greece (at least Athens and Rhodes) are a good idea.
  • They save you money even if you don’t see all the things.
  • They save you time by letting you bypass all but one ticket buying line.
    • Make sure to buy your combo ticket at one of the less popular attractions that will have a shorter line.
    • Then you can walk past the long lines at the more popular attractions by just waving your ticket at the officials.

Money:

  • Get cash from ATMs.
  • Remember “Euro”.

Scams:

  • I’ve seen the:
    • Survey Scam
    • Free Bracelet Scam
    • Cheap food item scam:
      • You go to a restaurant offering cheap gyros (these are really never too expensive).
      • Once inside, there is either no menu or they try to make you order without looking at the menu.
      • You order whatever you like, thinking since the gyros are cheap, the prices of other stuff can’t be that bad.
      • Everything else on the menu is OVERPRICED, but you don’t realize it until you get the bill.
    • Here are some other scams

Greece

How to get there:

You can enter this country air, land, or sea.

Phone:

  • 112 – Emergency
  • 166 – Ambulane
  • 199 – Fire
  • 100 – Police
  • 171 – Tourist Police

Website:

Videos:

Notes:

  • Don’t flush toilet paper.
    • Supposedly, it’s bad for the pipes.
    • You’re supposed to throw it in the trash can in the bathroom.
  • Although Greece is relatively inexpensive, you can go through all your money traveling to all the various islands.
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Rhodes

Posted by Heliocentrism on April 5, 2018

October 7th – 16th, 2017

By the time we got to Rhodes, Mark and I were a little burned out. I know it might not seem like it, but traveling non-stop can get tiring. It’s not as stressful as having a job where you are over worked and underappreciated, but if you do anything long enough you will need some sort of break. We took a break in Rhodes.

Play with me, Mark! The water’s not cold or anything…

Mark did some hotel hunting and found a hotel that was all inclusive. We paid about €40 for the both of us. We had buffet breakfasts, lunches, dinners, and drinks whenever we wanted. (The food wasn’t so great that we overate, but just good enough that we always looked forward to meal times.) There were a few nights where people came and danced for us. It was wonderful. We hardly ever left the hotel.

I spent most of my time writing. I was so behind on this blog, only finishing an entry right before it would be released. I would write all day, stopping only to eat or get coffee… and to watch people dance.

I will always stop whatever I’m doing to look at Greek dancing. It evolves kicking, shouting, and in the end, fire. It’s lots of fun!

The beaches in Rhodes were beautiful to look at. Swimming at the beach was a bit harder. There was very little sand. All they had were rocks, like in the photo above. All the hotels were next to the beach so the guest could look at the beach while they swim in the pools. (Many of the hotels in Rhodes are all-inclusive like the one we got.)

Some believe the Colossus stood with each foot where the 2 pillars with llamas are now.

We did do some sight-seeing. How could we leave without seeing Rhodes’ Acropolis and their museums filled with pottery? Greece is very beautiful and just filled with artifacts from antiquity, which I LOVE. But what I miss the most is…

baklava!! 


Greece

How to get there:

You can enter this country air, land, or sea.

Phone:

  • 112 – Emergency
  • 166 – Ambulane
  • 199 – Fire
  • 100 – Police
  • 171 – Tourist Police

Website:

Videos:

Notes:

  • Don’t flush toilet paper.
    • Supposedly, it’s bad for the pipes.
    • You’re supposed to throw it in the trash can in the bathroom.
  • Although Greece is relatively inexpensive, you can go through all your money traveling to all the various islands.

Acropolis of Rhodes

Basic Information

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

  • 24hrs

Notes:

  • Built in the 5th–3rd century BC.
  • Don’t Miss:
    • The Temple of Apollo
    • The Odeon
    • The Stadium
  • Near by you will find the Hellen

Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €9
  • €10 – Combo Ticket Includes admission to:
    • Grand Masters’ Palace,
    • Archaeological Museum,
    • the church of Our Lady of the Castle
    • Decorative Arts Collection

Hours:

  • 01Apr – 31Oct Mon-Sun, 0800-2000
  • 01Nov – 31Mar Tue-Sun, 0800-1500

Video

Notes:

  • Built in the late 7th century.
  • Don’t Miss:
    • Floor Mosaics
    •  Benito Mussolini‘s name on a large plaque near the entrance.
      • This was once his holiday home.

Archaeological Museum of Rhodes

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €8
  • €10 – Combo Ticket Includes admission to:
    • Grand Masters’ Palace,
    • Archaeological Museum,
    • the church of Our Lady of the Castle
    • Decorative Arts Collection

Hours:

  • Tu – Su 08.00-19.40
  • Mondays 13.30-19.40

Video

Notes:

  • Don’t Miss:

Watch out For:

  • €2 Gyros
    • A restaurant advertises cheap gyros. When you sit down they want you to order before looking at the menu. You think, “If the gyro is only €2, everything else must be similarly priced.” You order a gyro, fries, and a soda. When you get your bill, the total is €12. “How can that be,” you think as you look at your receipt. Then you realize, the gyros was €2, but the fries were €4 and the soda was was €6! It’s even more upsetting when you think about how rude the waiter was to you while you ate your meal.

Don’t Miss:

Map:

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Dead People’s Things

Posted by Heliocentrism on March 30, 2018

September 30th – October 6th, 2017

There is nothing that archaeologists love more than trash and dead people’s things. I guess they might like books more, but the pages don’t always stand the test of time. Trash, pottery, and tomb stones, on the other hand, last almost forever even after being neglected for hundreds of years.

a tombstone of a dead wrestler

In Athens we saw a lot of dead people’s stuff. It was amazing the amount of details that went into making burial chachkies. These items did nothing for the dead or even their family, but they’re doing wonders for us now. Every tombstone, sarcophagus, and piece of pottery tells us so much about the past. Mark and I even went to a museum that told the life story of some guy who died thousands of years ago, all with information they got from the things they found in his grave.

It seems that the more important a person was, the more pottery that person was buried with. These jugs would tell about the person’s life in picture form. If the person were an athlete, there would be a picture of a man running, wrestling, or doing some other athletic activity.

A lot of information about Greece’s past can be found on its old pottery. It’s like they used jugs as note pads. If you were an ancient and you thought that Telemachus was “oh, s00o hot” you would get some clay and throw a new jug with pictures of you making googly eyes at his half-naked body doing push-ups or something. Pottery was like the blogging of its time, except people had to come over to your house to look at your jars.

There is so much pottery in Greece. Every museum has a pottery section. Some dedicated entire floors to pottery. Mark and I found a few museums that only had pottery. By the time I left Athens, I was completely sick of pottery. I still enjoyed the tales they told, though.

Stories told on a dead guy’s pottery 


Greece

How to get there:

You can enter this country air, land, or sea.

Phone:

  • 112 – Emergency
  • 166 – Ambulane
  • 199 – Fire
  • 100 – Police
  • 171 – Tourist Police

Website:

Videos:

Notes:

  • Don’t flush toilet paper.
    • Supposedly, it’s bad for the pipes.
    • You’re supposed to throw it in the trash can in the bathroom.
  • Although Greece is relatively inexpensive, you can go through all your money traveling to all the various islands.

National Archaeological Museum

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • 10 Euros

Hours:

  • 9:30 – 17:30

Videoes:

Notes:


Ancient Agora of Athens

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €8
  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 19:00

Video

Notes:


Temple of Olympian Zeus

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €6
  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8.00-18.00
  • Last entrance: 17.30

Videos:

Notes:


Hadrian’s Library

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €4
  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • Monday to Sunday 08.00 – 15.00
  • Last Admission: 14.45
  • When the temperature reaches above 39o C, the Archaeological Site will remain open from 8:00 till 13:00

Video

Notes:

  • Built  in AD 132.

Roman Agora

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 15:00
  • When the temperature reaches above 39o C, the Archaeological Site will remain open from 8:00 till 13:00

Video

Notes:

  • Built between 19 and 11 B.C.

Kerameikos

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 19:00

Video

Notes:

  • Don’t Miss:
    • The Pompeion

Acropolis of Athens

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 20:00

Video

Notes:


Lyceum

Basic Information

Website

Cost:

  • €30 – special package ticket that’s valid for 5 days and includes:
    •  Acropolis of Athens & South Slope of Acropolis + North slope of Acropolis
    • Ancient Agora of Athens & Museum of the Ancient Agora
    • Archaeological Museum of Kerameikos
    • Archaeological Site of Lykeion
    • Hadrian’s Library, Kerameikos
    • Olympieio
    • Roman Agora of Athens

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 19:00

Notes:

  • The museums nearby are not included. You needed to purchase additional tickets for them.

Acropolis Museum

Basic Information

Website

 

Cost:

  • €5
  • Check the website for days when entrance fees are waved.

Hours:

  • Opens at 8:00
    • Closing time varies by day and season.
    • Check website for closing times
  • Closed: 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May, 25 and 26 December
  • On August Full Moon and European Night of Museums, the Acropolis Museum operates until 12 midnight.

Video

Notes:


Don’t Miss:

Map:

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