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Archive for the ‘Kobayashi 市’ Category

Not According to Google Maps

Posted by Heliocentrism on July 3, 2011

May 1, 2011

All Pictures

A wet morning

Campsite to Campsite

When we finally got to the Kobayashi camp site it was raining and the sun had already set. We managed to find the campsite and a spot to set up our tent without finding the camp office to check in.

We met a Japanese couple who spoke almost no English. They were the only other people at the camp. They showed us where everything was told us that the camp office was closed for the night. They recommended that we stop by the next morning to register and what not.

Those car mats would be complete soaked by morning.

Konsento doko desu-ka?

There was a kitchen area. It had sinks and lights. It was great for cooking, but not for eating since there were no chairs. There was a pavilion where we could sit to eat, but it had no lights.

We had electronics, like my phone, that needed to be charged. The last campsite had an outlet in the bathroom, but this one didn’t. We asked the couple, “Konsento doko desu-ka?” But they told us that there were no outlets.

the one and only outlet

But the place did have lights; they were just not turned on. Mark and I followed the string of lights to where they would be plugged in. At the end of the string of bulbs was a light switch and 2 electrical outlets. We flipped the switch, lighting up the whole camp. Then we plugged in our phone charger. The next day we got up early and plugged in our rice cooker to make rice for lunch later that day in another town.

We sat in the pavilion, eating our dinner in the light we had just turned on. The couple walk past us in the rain, looking a little confused. “How did they get light?”

 

This is what most tourists come to Kobayashi to see.

It’s not just a test! 

The next day we left the campsite. It was still raining. We saw some of the sites of Kobayashi through the down pour.

I have to be honest here. Yes, the town of Kobayashi was located very conveniently along the route we were taking. But the real reason I stopped in this town was for it’s name.

I am a Star Trek fan and I just wanted to say that I have been to a place called Kobayashi. Now if I could only find a place called Maru

tired already!

At least it’s not our own backyard.

After a day of sightseeing and step climbing we were ready to set up the tent and relax at a new campsite. I found one on the island of Oyano. I looked at a map on google and found the campsite.

From google maps, I got the website, address, phone number, and driving directions. I made reservations. I had a reservation number; all I had to do was show up.

We got to the campsite, a lady working there told us that we were in the wrong place. The campsite named on my paper with the reservation number was not here.

“Are you sure? Because google maps, says that this is here…”

The lady didn’t care what google maps was. She shock her head. “Not here”.

We wondered around the island, looking for our campsite. We stopped people walking on the road. Half of them pointed us to head further south, the other half had never heard of this campsite that someone had clearly mis-labled on google maps.

 

This is awkward…

We gave up hope of finding our campsite and just started to look for any campsite as we moved south. We saw a sign in Japanese that promised a campsite on the next island over. So we crossed the bridge.

We drove along the shore until we ran out of road. Then we saw another campsite sign. We got out the car and knocked on the door.

“Konichiwa. Campsite doko des ka?”

The lady beckoned me to follow her. She led me passed a bar in-the-making next to her house as she explained how much this campsite would be per night. She told me where the bathroom was and where to park my car.

She took me to a clearing behind her house. Mark and I stood there in disbelief. We had no chose but to stay.

We set up the tent and made tea for our dinner. As I sipped my tea, taking in the view I turned to Mark and said, “I can’t believe that we drove clear across Kyushu, to end up camping in someone’s backyard.”

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your banktoaskwhatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan. I’ve never been a tourist.)

Suki Suspension Bridge
& Mamako Falls

(ままこ滝)
(Ma mako taki)

How to get there:

  • 32°04’14.4″N 131°05’04.7″E

From Udo Shrine –

  • Get back on route 220 heading north
  • Take a left (west) onto route 10.
  • Keep straight on route 268 which will turn into 221 soon before you have to turn.
  • When you get to the town of Kobayashi turn right (north) onto route 265.
  • Go past road 26.
  • When you get to Suki Post office on your left take a right (east) at that intersection then another right at the T-intersections.
  • Stay on that road and turn right right before the baseball field.

Phone:

  • City Hall 81-(0)984-23-1111

Websites:

Cost:

  • 200YEN when open
  • 200Yen on the honor system when closed

Hours:


Inyoseki
(陰陽石)

How to get there:

  • 32°00’58.3″N 131°00’23.6″E
From the Campsite –
  • Get back on route 265 heading south.
  • Follow the signs that leads to the rock penis.

Address:

陰陽石茶屋
日本
〒886-0001 宮崎県小林市東方 3332-5

Phone:

  • 0984-27-3611

Website:

Cost:

  • Free

Hours:

  • Always available
Notes:
  • Legend says Inyoseki is where a dragon ascended and fell in love with a beautiful woman.
  • This is a natural rock shape.

777 Steps
in Higashikata Nature Park
(東片自然公園)
(Higashikatashizenkōen)

How to get there:

  • 32°30’18.1″N 130°39’06.6″E
  • Go on route 219 heading west
  • Turn right (east) onto route 3.
  • After you pass route 336 take the next left  (west) turn.
  • Then make a U-turn as soon as you can and go under the road for route 3.
  • Turn right at the end of the road on the left side there will be a bridge and a parking lot.

Address:

This is in the city of Yatsushiro, Komamoto. At  the intersection of Route 3 and Rinkosen

Phone: 

  • (0965) 33-4123

Website:

Cost:

  • Free

Hours:

  • Always availible

Notes:

  • Bring lots of water!

Map:

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Posted in Japan, Kobayashi 市, Kumamoto 県, Kyūshū, Miyazaki 県, Yatsushiro 市, Ōyano 町 | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Tombs, Towers, and Temples

Posted by Heliocentrism on July 2, 2011

April 30, 2011

All Pictures

inside the tomb looking out

This would make an excellent swimming pool!

The next day we had ramen for breakfast and headed out for a day filled with sightseeing. The first stop was at the Saitobaru Burial Mounds, not too far from our campsite.

The main mound is in the middle of a small pit. We walked around the mound and then climbed down in the mound where the bodies were kept. There was nothing spectacular about it, but that is how most mounds are. That’s why I prefer Almond Joy.

What I really wanted to do was to flood the main mound and make a great big pool. The mound in the middle would have made a great swim-up bar.

Heiwadai Gardens

They look so surprised to see us.

Next we went to a tower that was built where Emperor Jimmu‘s palace once was. This tower was to represent the divine right of the emperor. Since Emperor Jimmu was the first emperor of Japan who was the son of the sun goddess, I guess this tower was a big deal.

It was not, in my opinion, the highlight of this park. That honor goes to the Haniwa Garden. I was delighted by the little statues of soldiers and animals. The expressions of their faces entertained me to no end.

a shrine for couples

I’d like one marriage, please.

This stop was not part of the original plan, but we saw a picture of it. Since it was along our route we stopped to check it out.

It’s a really nice island, filled with couples ready to pray for marriage blessings. At the time of this trip, I already knew that Mark would be the guy I would marry, so I guess I too, was looking for a marriage blessing.

The ice cream shop near the island is great too. There were so many unusual flavors of ice cream that it took me about 5 minutes to pick one. I went with Mango, boring I know… Next time I will try Tomato.

Sweet Potato Ice cream

More Ice cream? 

I felt bad about choosing such a normal flavor of ice cream. When I finished the cone, I promised myself that next time, if such an opportunity where to present itself again, I would go with a flavor of ice cream that I could not find anywhere else.

Once we were at the next shrine there was another ice cream shop. There weren’t as many flavors as the last ice cream place, but I got the chance to try sweet potato ice cream. It tasted, just like a cold sweet potato. Not bad.

 

make it in the ring for good luck

Make a Wish, if you can.

At Udo Shrine you can make wishes. Just pay 100YEN for 5 stones and toss the stones into the ring. You must throw with your left hand if you are male, and right, if you are female. I would have tried it, but there was too many people pelting the ring.

It started to rain, which is an ominous sign to any camper.

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your banktoaskwhatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan. I’ve never been a tourist.)

Saitobaru Burial Mounds
(西都原古墳群)
(Saitobarukofun)

How to get there:

  • 32°07’29.4″N 131°23’21.3″E

From the Camping Village Beach Takanabe –

  • Go straight from Takanabe station towards route 10.
  • Follow the directions to stay on route 24.
  • On route 24 you will see signs for the mounds.
  • Route 24 will turn, but you should stay straight onto route 318.

Website

Cost:

  • Free
  • Free Parking

Hours:

  • Always available
  • There is a shop nearby where you can buy souvenirs, lunch, and expensive groceries. It is open 9:00 – 17:00

Notes:

You can go inside the main mound.


Heiwadai Tower
(八紘一宇)
(Hakkō ichiu)

How to get there:

  • 31°56’51.1″N 131°24’57.6″E

From the Saitobaru Burial Mounds –

  • Go back to route 318 heading east
  • Route 318 turns into route 24
  • Take route 219 heading south
  • Take route 10 heading south
  • Turn right (west) at the 3rd light after the intersection with route 9.
  • At the end of the road, take a left (south) on route 44.
  • At the 2nd light turn right (west) on route 333. You will see the tower in the distance.
  • Park at First Parking.

Website:

Cost:

  • Free
  • Free Parking

Hours:

  • Always available

Notes:

There are many things in the park. Be sure to check out Haniwa Garden.


Aoshima Shrine
(青島神社)
(Aoshima-jinja)

How to get there:

  • 31°48’15.8″N 131°28’32.1″E

From Heiwadai Tower –

  • Get back on route 10 heading south.
  • Stay straight on route 10 which will turn into route 220.
  • You will see it along the way to Udo Shrine.

Address:

2-13-1, Aoshima, Miyazaki
Miyazaki 889-2162

Phone:

  • 0985-65-1262

Website:

Downloads:

e-mail: shrine@theia.ocn.ne.jp

Cost:

  • Free

Hours:

  • You can go anytime

Notes:

  • This is the place to go when you want to be married.
    • I don’t know if you go there when you are engaged, or when you are still looking.

Udo Shrine
(鵜戸神宮社務所)
(Udo-jingū)

How to get there:

  • 31°39’00.7″N 131°27’58.2″E

From Heiwadai Tower –

  • Get back on route 10 heading south.
  • Stay straight on route 10 which will turn into route 220.
  • Once you’re in the town of Udo turn left (east) on route 433
  • Follow the signs, or tourists to the shrine
  • It is about a 20 minute walk from the parking lot to the shrine.
  • There are two ways of walking to the shrine. One way, the old path, goes over a hill. The other way, the new path, goes through a tunnel.
  • They both have a lot of steps, but most people take the new path because the old path has many steps that are not in good condition.
  • Just follow the crowd if you want to take the new path.

Website

Cost:

  • Free

Hours: 

  • Apr – Sept 6:00 – 19:00
  • Oct – Mar 7:00 – 19:00

Notes:

This shrine is very beautiful.


Mamako Daki Campground
(まま子滝キャンプ場)
(Mamakotaki kyanpuba)

How to get there:

  • 32°04’21.1″N 131°05’22.3″E

From Udo Shrine –

  • Get back on route 220 heading north
  • Take a left (west) onto route 10.
  • Keep straight on route 268 which will turn into 221 soon before you have to turn.
  • When you get to the town of Kobayashi turn right (north) onto route 265.
  • Go past road 26.
  • When you get to Suki Post office on your left take a right (east) at that intersection then another right at the T-intersections.
  • Stay on that road, you will shortly reach the campsite which is near the baseball field.

Address:

宮崎県小林市須木大字下田976番地2

Phone:

  • 0984-48-2480

Website:

Cost:

  • Bungalow (8 person max) 4000YEN/per building
  • Permanent Tent (8 person max) 3000YEN/ tent
  • Bring your own tent 100YEN/ person

Hours:

  • Open May to September.
  • Check in before 18:00

Notes:

  • There are toilets
  • There were showers, though none were turned on at the time of our stay.
  • There is a kitchen area with running water and outlets

Map

Posted in Japan, Kobayashi 市, Kyūshū, Miyazaki 県, Miyazaki 市, Nichinan 市, Saito 市 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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