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Archive for the ‘Incheon’ Category

The Last 12 hours in Korea

Posted by Heliocentrism on December 4, 2009

November 30-December 1, 2009

All Pictures

Incheon International Airport

In Incheon

Mark and I had an early flight to Bangkok and rather than be rushed in the morning or risk the possibility of getting there late, we decided to make our way to Incheon International Airport the evening before the flight. I’m not sure if I’ve ever mentioned this, but, I LOVE Incheon airport. It’s the best airport in the whole world! So, I was happy about getting there way too early.

We were planning to take an airport bus, but we noticed that the sign for the bus stop was no longer there. Apparently the bus we needed no longer runs. So we had to take the subway.

According the Korean transportation website, you can get the money on your T-money card refunded at any GS25. If you take the subway to the airport you will see a GS25 right before you scan out. If you scan out before you get your refund, just tell the person at the counter by the turn styles.  If he or she is nice, you’ll be allowed to go to the GS25 without being charged.

using some free wi-fi at a closed airport coffee shop

We wandered around exploring the airport, had dinner, and changed some money at one of the many banks at the airport. Then we headed to the 4th floor to a closed coffee shop for some free internet and quietness.

Not too far from that coffee place is a glass bridge from which you can look down and see the people inside the terminal who have passed the security check. There are also some round chair things that are great for sleeping on.

The next morning we woke up had breakfast and checked in. We had tickets for Thai Air. The baggage limit for our flight was 20kg per person for check-in luggage and 7kg total for all carry-ons. I’ve never had anyone weigh my carry-on, so I was surprised when someone stopped us before we went through the security check and asked us to put all our carry-ons on a scale. All of our carry-ons were over the 7kg limit, but only Mark’s backpack was deemed too big. He was sent back to check it in. We were not charged for the overweight or extra checked in bag.

Because we were so early we had time to explore the terminals. Mark did a little shopping for his mom at a duty-free store. Then we went to our terminal. This is where we found the free showers.

Free Shower at Incheon Airport!

Shower me!

The showers themselves are free and you can use it any time during their opening hours. If you need a towel, that’s 2,000KRW. If you need shampoo and other things, it’s 6,000KRW. We didn’t want to travel with wet towels, so Mark and I “rented” towels and got all spruced up. Unfortunately the free showers are only available to passengers who have passed through the security check.

Mark’s first drink in Thailand

In the land of Smiles

Once at the airport in Bangkok we went downstairs to get an airport bus into the city. It cost 150BHT per person. On the bus we met someone who was staying at the same hostel* we had made reservations for.

*I don’t really like the hostel in which we are staying now, so I will not include any of its information in this blog.

The next day we went sightseeing.

What is Mark so mad about?

Mark worked for a Pagoda Jr in Incheon. His boss, a man who goes by the name “Steve” Jung, was very unethical. He was supposed to take 4.5% of Mark’s monthly pay, match it, and put all this money into the National Pension for Mark to collect after completing his contract. This is required by Korean law. But Mr. Jung took the money from Mark’s pay and put it into Mr. Jung’s own pocket. When Mark went to the pension office to file for his lump-sum refund he found out about Mr. Jung’s shenanigans*. Mr. Jung got mad at Mark, for some reason, and threaten to kick Mark out of his apartment and to withhold his last paycheck and end of contract bonus.

* Mr. Jung’s shenanigans:

1. Not reporting the actual start date of his employees

2. Not reporting the actual salary of his employees

3. Not giving his employees pay subs.

4. Not paying one red cent into the National Pension of his employees.

There are more, but they can’t be legally proven.

 So far the Korean government has done nothing to punish Steve Jung or stop him from doing this to other employees. Steve Jung still owns his Pagoda Jr. and still cheats his employees, both the Korean and non-Korean ones.

It’s hard to know if Mr. Jung is still doing this to other employee since “Steve” is not his real name, but an English name he has given himself. The Korean government did manage to get Mark’s pension from Mr. Jung, but not part of the salary that was stolen from Mark.

**** UPDATE ****

Years after this post, the Korean government somehow managed to fine Mr. Jung and Mark got back most, but not all of the money owed to him. It helped that Mark checked in every so often, when returning to Korea for unrelated reasons, to inquire about his case.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible or most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets, muggers, or scam artists. Use common sense and you will be okay. Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

You should watch out when crossing the street, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and little old ladies will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 year and had a fantastic time.


Incheon International Airport
(인천국제공항)

How to get there:

  • 37°27’36.6″N 126°26’26.6″E

There are 3 main ways of leaving or getting to the airport.

1. The Metro

  • It’s pretty easy and not expensive.
  • ₩10,000/ 10USD is more than enough to get to or from anywhere.
  • The subway even goes past Uijeonbu.

2. A bus

  • This is also pretty easy.
  • It will cost about ₩8,500 for most trips or less if you have a T-money card.

3. A Taxi

  • It doesn’t matter what those taxi drivers say. This is the most expensive option.
  • You will most likely get stuck in traffic.

Phone

Websites:

Downloads:

Notes:

This is the best airport in the whole wild world!

  • Free wi-fi
  • After security check:
    • There are free showers. (Open7am-9pm)
      • You can rent a towel, buy some shampoo and soap.
    • There is a theater
    • You can learn about Korea.
    • There is a Family Mart convenience store.
  • Before security check:
    • There are lockers for your luggage.
    • There is a post office.
    • You can rent a phone.
    • There is a Family Mart convenience store.
    • There is a GS25 convenience store right before you leave the subway and enter the airport. You can get any extra money on your T-money refunded there.

Map:

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Posted in Bangkok, Incheon, South Korea, Thailand | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Fish and a Movie: The count down to Thailand

Posted by Heliocentrism on November 23, 2009

November 22, 2009

All Pictures

Care for a snack?

This is the end, my only friend, the end

November 24, 2009, will be the start of my last week in Korea. Mark, though his contract isn’t over, is on vacation. His last contracted weeks will be spent on vacation which will end on the day we leave Korea.

So we are doing any and everything we ever wanted to do while in Korea but haven’t gotten around to yet. Yesterday, it was number 8 on my list and number 6 on Marks.

yum!

My #8. Dr. Fish

A friend of ours told Mark about a Dr. Fish place in Incheon she visited once. She told us it was near a “book cafe”. Mark and I walked along the street away from the Arts Center station and towards the Shinsegae. There was a Dr. Fish sign to our left. It said, “Dr. Fish Coffee Bread.” We thought it was two signs really close together. It wasn’t.

We went to the 3rd floor and didn’t see a Dr. Fish place. Annoyed because Korea seems to be filled with many misleading signs, we went into the coffee shop to complain to each other about Korea’s many misleading signs. In the corner was the Dr. Fish pool.

The place was really crowded, but no one seemed interested in sticking their feet into the fishy pond. What appeared to be the main attraction was the free bread. You can take as much bread as you like, but you only get 1 gram of butter and 3 grams of jam.

Mark’s #6. DVD Bang (DVD )

I’ll be completely honest with you. DVD bangs are the places that teenagers and cheap adults go to make-out or have sex. I mean, look at the sofa in the room. It’s really a bed… a leather bed.

But, Mark had never been in one and we are leaving in a week. How could we leave Korea without trying one out? …without blogging about one? We picked Valkere as our movie. Meh…

It’s like watching at home, except way more expensive.

DVD bangs are easily found all over Korea. It isn’t cheaper than a movie theater, but that’s not really the point, now is it? It cost about 15,000KRW for the room. That’s about the price of 2 movie tickets. So if there are 3 of you then it would be cheaper than going to the movies. But the room is small.

It does feel a little creepy sitting in a tiny “make-out room” and the leather sofa doesn’t help. But it’s nice to be able to watch any movie on demand. It kind of reminds me of something… Oh, my DVD player at home.

So what are the reasons to use a DVD room when you aren’t a horny teenager or cheating on your spouse when you should be at work? Well, there are a few:

  • You have to wait for about 1.5 hours.
  • You need to take a 1.5 hour nap.
  • You really love leather sofas, but your spouse or parent won’t let you have one.
  • You need to have some alone time. (Scratch that. It sounds too weird.)

Nice…

Cheap Movie Tickets

To get a half price movie ticket, just show up at a theater before 9:00 or 10:00 am. Most theaters are only open for morning-half-price movies on the weekends, but some have them on the weekdays too. On the weekends, it’s best to buy your early morning movie tickets the day before. They tend to get sold out or reserved by Koreans online. On weekdays you might be the only one in the theater.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Book & Spa Cafe
(Dr. Fish Coffee Bread)

How to get there:

Website

Downloadable:

Cost:

  • 4,000KRW for the Dr. Fish (about 4UDS)
  • Way too much for drinks
  • Bread, plain coffee, and liquid sugar are free. But, who wants that when there are lattes to be had?

Hours:

  • Sun – Thur 10:30 – 1:00
  • Fri – Sat 10:30 – 2:00

Notes:

  • Be prepared to be stared at if you do the doctor fish thing. Most people don’t want to do it, they just like ogling the few who do.

Map:

Posted in Incheon, Namdong, South Korea | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

A mission for Quietness

Posted by Heliocentrism on October 20, 2009

October 17-18, 2009

All Pictures

Our Fabulous Tent

Just to get away from it all…

Every now and then I get tired of city life. I don’t think I will ever pack it all up and move to the country. Actually, I tried it twice… Didn’t like it. Instead I like to live in or near a big city and go camping on the weekends.

hunting for firewood

Walla Walla

The first time, I was living and going to school in the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C. The crime and the traffic got to me and the crazy notion of moving to Walla Walla, Washington was somehow put in my head by my physics professor. I had romantic thoughts of waking up early and doing country stuff before classes. I don’t remember what they were now. Maybe I wanted to milk a cow or feed chickens.

Life in Walla Walla was so depressingly dull. There was nothing there. There was nothing to do. I had a boring job as a motel clerk and I was always jealous of the guests because they would check out and leave Walla Walla after staying just a few days.

ajumma hoe-down!

The last straw came on the day I tried to get a library card. If you have ever been lucky enough to hold a Montgomery County Public Library card or a library card from any of the surrounding counties, you know the caliber of book borrowing I was used to. I walked into the library in Walla Walla with hopes of escaping my podunk town by way of literature. Yes, there was only one library. There might be more now, but when I lived there, there was only one.

Spying on the ajummas

It looked like it used to be a house and that, if ghosts existed, this would be the type of place worth haunting. It didn’t have tons of books, but I hoped that I could find something. I went up to the counter to ask for a form to get a library card. The librarian was very friendly. She smiled and asked to see some ID and something with my address to prove I was a Walla Wallain.

I handed her my driver’s license and letter from my dorm. Her smile disappeared. She then informed me that I was not a resident of Walla Walla, but of College Place and that I could not get a library card.

The town I was living in was so small, that I would have never thought that it was actually two towns really close together. To add to my disappointment, later that day I found out that other than the school library filled with textbooks and research papers, College Place had no libraries of its own.

I remember driving home in tears. I phoned my mom that evening blubbering about how I had made a huge mistake and that the past 3 months in Walla Walla were the worst 3 months of my life. (This is really bad when you consider that as a 10-year-old, I spent several months partially living in a house with no roof. Walla Walla was, hands down, way worse!)

My mom called my academic dean from my old college and they re-enrolled me at the school in D.C. Then my mom sent my brother, Malcolm, out to Washington to drive with me back to the east coast.

The second time was when I moved out to the country side of Japan after living in London, but I leave that for some other time.

What is he up to?

Peace and Quiet?

This weekend was to be a little getaway for Mark and me. We wanted to be “one with nature”. It was to be a quiet couple days in the woods. When we camped here a few weeks ago it was really nice and quiet. So, we thought we’d go back.

We remembered that, although our last camping spot was nice, the higher you go up the trail the more open and scenic the camping spots got. We walked a lot further up the path this time.

Who is this lady and why is she in our tent?

We found a nice spot and set up our tent. Then we left to go get some meat to grill and water to drink. When we got back there was another tent set up and herd of ajummas dancing around and making a lot of noise.

We could tell from their supplies that the group of ajummas weren’t spending the night. We just had to wait until they left. They played games and made a lot of noise. It was a bit annoying since we did want quietness, but it was still entertaining to see them dance and have a great time.

At one point one of them got tired and decided to sit in our tent. Yes, a person we did not know just walked up to our tent and plopped herself down. She never spoke a word to us, or glance in our direction. She didn’t even say an “안녕하세요” to us. Later that same women walked too close to our firewood and fell onto it.

We didn’t mind someone sitting in our tent. We just wished she would have been courteous enough to ask first. Had she asked, we would have cleared a space for her and even invited some of the other ladies to sit with her. But, she didn’t, so we spent the rest of the time she was there staring at her suspiciously.

The group on a whole was not too bad. They were loud, but seemed very happy and that’s always good. At some point they gave us treats and booze. We gave them some chips and awkward English conversation. Then, long before sunset they packed up and left leaving a noticeable quietness in their wake.

Soon after, a little family with a screaming baby set up their tent near ours. Did I mention that this was a huge campground and that there was a plethora of other open spots to choose from? …some of these other spots were even easier to get to.

Are we on film again?!

Filming now?

Then a small film crew came by. They just stood off to the side filming everyone. They stayed for a while filming. When they moved in for close-ups of the family camping next to us without even asking their permission, Mark and I decided to go for a little walk fearing that we would be next. I have no idea why they were filming, but I didn’t want to be part of it.

I have a friend who went to a festival and was asked by someone to pose for a picture. Thinking that it is just some guy or lady on vacation asking this, she said yes. Months later she saw that photo in an ad on the subway.

Who is creepier, them filming the family without their consent or me?

The night would have been quiet, but the people in the next camp over kept making noise. Their screaming baby cried for most of the night. The kid also woke up early the next day to get in some good screaming before the sun came up.

Where is your dignity man?

Don’t go there!

Once the screaming baby crew left, another group came by. These people liked to pee next to our tent. They would walk into the wooded area near we were camped, but they wouldn’t walk too far in. Maybe they were afraid of bears? We and anyone nearby could watch them pee, but they didn’t seem to care.

When the next group of merrymakers came by we gave up. There would be no quiet weekend for us.

Part of the reason why our weekend went so badly had something to do with Korean society. Individually, Koreans are really nice, caring people… Well, except for the really racist ones you’ll find every now and then, like in any society. But, most Koreans are really very nice and will bend over backwards to help you, just like all people in general, once they know you.

But strangers here are grade-A jerks. Strangers will bump into you, run you over, spit on you, swear at you, cut in front of you in line… There is really no sense of, “maybe we shouldn’t, others might not like it” or “that’s not mine, so maybe I should leave it alone”. Remember our tent sitting friend?

Really guys? I’m still trying to sleep…

Its like everyone has a limited amount of politeness energy. If you use too much of it on strangers, you won’t have enough for family, friends, and co-workers. So, it’s okay to be a jerk to strangers.

Now it’s too cold to go camping. But we will take trips around the country and to other countries.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Ganghwa-do
(강화도)

How to Get There:

  • 37°44’22.6″N 126°29’23.9″E

From Seoul:

1- Via Gimpo Airport:

  1. Go to Gimpo Airport on lines 5, 9, and the Airport line.
  2. Go to the international terminal where the bus stops are.
  3. You should wait at gate #1 for bus #3. The ride cost a little over 3,000KRW from Gimpo Airport. You can use your T-money but you must first tell the bus driver your destination.

You can catch this bus at other stops in Seoul and Gimpo.

  • Here is a picture of the stops in Hangul.
  • Here is a picture of the time table in Hangul. It’s on the second row.

Get off at the last stop, Ganghwa Bus Terminal.

2- Via Bupyoung Station:

  1. Go to Bupyoung Station on Seoul line 1 and Incheon line 1.
  2. Go to the underground mall and through exit 23. Walk straight.
  3. Look for a blue #90 bus’ bus stop. They come by pretty often, so don’t worry if you miss it. The ride cost a little over 3,000KRW. You can use your T-money but you must first tell the bus driver your destination (Ganghwa-do).

Get off at the last stop, Ganghwa Bus Terminal.

3- Find a red buses that go to Ganghwa. Google says it’s #3000 and you can catch it from Hongdae Station.

Notes:

  • Do not swim too far out in the water on the north side of this island. The land on the other side is North Korea!

Hamheodongcheon Campsite
(함허동천야영장)

How to Get There:

  • 37°36’41.0″N 126°27’09.7″E

The directions are the same as the ones to get to Dongmak beach. They are both on the same road. If you can’t pronounce the name, just say, “camping” and point to your map.

From Dongmak Beach

  • Take any bus going left to right when your back is to the beach . Tell the driver where you want to go.
  • The entrance is not very obvious, so again, make sure to tell the bus driver where you want to go.

Cost:

The picture above might be helpful if you can read Korean. The smaller fees are for entrance to the park. There is a mountain you can climb to visit a temple. Camping overnight cost a bit more. Mark paid about 9,000KRW for him and me. Having camped in Korea before  I think the price is calculated like this:

  • 2 adult entrance tickets: 1,500KRW X 2 = 3,000KRW (We were of a group of less than 30 people.)
  • 2 adults with own tent:   3,000KRW X 2 = 6,000KRW

  • total   = 9,000KRW (about 9USD)

That’s how it worked at Muuido.

There might be tents to rent, but don’t count on it. It might be something that’s only available in the summer.

Hours:

Always open

Notes:

  • There is a 24 hour Family Mart right by the entrance where you can buy food and supplies.
  • There is a restaurant or two within the campsite, but they aren’t always open. Unfortunately we didn’t see a noraebang.
  • The further you go up the better the campsites get.
  • There are wooden platforms you can put your tent on, but you don’t have to use them.
  • You can pitch your tent anywhere you find space.

Map:

Click here for Google maps


Posted in Ganghwa, Incheon, South Korea | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Chosuk Camping

Posted by Heliocentrism on October 8, 2009

October 2-4, 2009

All Pictures

Dongmak Beach (Or Mark’s East Beach as I like to tell Mark…)

The way of the sword

First off I want to mention that this island is where Incheon borders North Korea. In fact this is where they used to train South Korean prisoners to go fight North Korea during the Korean War. The prisoners fought in hopes of winning for South Korea and regaining their freedom. It was all for naught, since the convicts were all thrown back in jail when the war ended.

This island has been the battleground of many wars. This was where the US tried to invade South Korea in 1871. The French tried it here before that in 1866. And then the Japanese showed up in 1875. Here is also where the scene of the Gangwha Massacre took place in 1951. A lot of people have died very violently on this island.

But a lot has changed since those old days of war when South Korea had to fight off its enemies. Now life is pretty laid back and has a small town or even a country-life feel to it. It’s hard to believe that Seoul is right around the corner and North Korea is even closer.

Our Chuseok dinner

What is Chuseok?

Chuseok is the Korean version of Thanksgiving. If you are a traditional Korean, on Chuseok you would go to your hometown or your spouse’s hometown to visit family. Once there you would go to the burial places of deceased relatives, clean their tomb stones and pay your respects by offering the spirits food and drinks. You would eat lots of food and play traditional games with the kids. You might even catch a ssireum match or two.

The only ssireum match we got to see

Chuseok is the worst time to travel. Just like travelling around Thanksgiving in the states, everyone and their mom is on the road. I wanted to go to Jeju Island, but all the tickets were sold out. Camping on the east coast was also not an option because, again, all the train tickets were sold out. The only places for us to go were areas that we could get to by Seoul mass transit.

One of the rare bus sightings on Dongmak beach.

I need wheels

If I were to go back I would rent a car or a scooter. The island is huge, buses don’t come by very often, no one seems to know the bus schedule, and taxis are hard to get anywhere other than the bus terminals. The guy at the Tourist Information office recommended renting a bicycle, but there is no way that would have worked. The island is not only really big, but also hilly.

There is also no way to get to the bike rental place other than going by taxi. It’s right next to the Gapgot Dondae in case you want to give it a try. I don’t know how much it costs to rent bike since it was closed when we got there, but apparently you can rent them for hours or days at a time.

Don’t ask the lady at this counter for information. She’ll mislead you.

See some of the sights

None of the attractions are nice enough or big enough to spend a whole day to see. The ideal thing would be to spend a day going from attraction to attraction. That, however, is impossible because of the sporadic public transportation system. You never know when the bus will come, where it will go, or who can answer your questions about what bus to take.

During this trip Mark and I would go to the terminal bus station and ask about 4 people, which bus to take and we would get about 5 different answers. It turns out that the bus drivers are the best people to ask. It takes about 5 minutes for them to give you an answer since they have to go to the bus drivers’ break room and consult a few timetables, but you can rely on their answers.

The whole time I was there I kept thinking, if only there were scooters to rent or a bus route map and schedule. I hope that a member of the Ganghwa board of tourism reads this and decides to publish a bus route map.

mud left behind when the tide goes out

Dongmak Beach

It cost us 22,000KRW to get a taxi to Dongmak Beach from the terminal station, but there were 4 of us. Our plan was to camp out on the beach. I had no delusions of swimming. Beaches on the west coast of Korea are glorified mud pits after the tide goes out and just plain muddy water when the tide is in.

Mom, is this supposed to be fun?

There were many day tents on the beach when we got there so we figured that we were the only ones spending the night. Mark and I had a tent, but our friends did not. Their plan was to rent a tent. It seems like, had we done this in the summer there would have been tents to rent. But, this was October and all the tent renters closed up shop and migrated south for the winter.

Mark and I told them that tent renting stops in Korea on whatever the last day of summer is decided to be. We told them where to buy cheap tents, which at this time of year are on sale for about 30USD to make room for fall stock. But, they didn’t want to spend the money. They decided to take their chances with a rental tent.

Many things change here once the summer ends. The water at the foot washing station didn’t have running water. The shower facilities, despite the fact that there was running water, were closed. We tried to jump the fence and use it anyway, but random Korean tourists who just couldn’t mind their own business, kept telling us that we should use the foot washing station to shower.

Like moths to a flame

On the up side, the place was quite uncrowded!

At night we put up our tent and started a campfire. The fire seemed to spark the interests of many of the Koreans on the beach. They kept coming over starting awkward small talk while warming themselves by the fire. After a while some of them felt guilty for taking all our fire warmth, so they went out and got more wood, chopped it up and tended the fire for us.

We showed one kid and his parents how to roast hot dogs over the campfire. They politely ate the wieners we gave them, but I’m sure they thought it was the weirdest thing in the world. To show their appreciation they bought us a big bag of chips. “Here foreigners, this is what you are supposed to eat around a campfire.”

putting up our tent

Since there was no tent to rent, our friends set out to find information about nearby hotels. When they came back they reported that everything was too expensive at about 40USD per night. Personally, I didn’t think that was too expensive for 2 people, but they preferred to sleep on a bench near our tent. When I say “they” and mean the guy. The young lady was clearly upset.  Feeling bad for them, we shared our tent. But little did we know that our generosity would not stop there.

They brought and bought no food the entire trip. Mark and I would cook our meals and they would just sit there watching us. Occasionally I would hear comments like, “Wow, that smells good,” or “That looks tasty.” It would have been really rude of us to not share with them. And, I would have felt uncomfortable chowing down while they sat there staring at us drooling.

At first, I figured that we would share our first meal with them, and then they would buy and prepare the next meal. We even mentioned that we had just bought all the supplies across the street from the Family Mart. But, they were more than content to eat our food and not reciprocate in any way.

I’m not even going to offer to help. Nope!

They didn’t even offer to wash a dish or to help clean up. The next day Mark and I took down our tent and they sat there watching us. They had the gall to not even pretend to be busy doing something else. There were no lockers at the bus terminal so Mark and I had to carry our tent and grill around all day. Neither the guy nor his girlfriend offered to help carry anything not even for a few seconds.

In fact, while Mark and I were at the bus terminal asking everyone we could for directions and bus numbers to get to our destinations, both of them sat on their asses and did nothing. They didn’t even help to figure out which gate we should stand by or when to get off the bus.

It did rain a bit, but I still LOVE camping!

Another Campsite

The next evening we eventually made our way to the Hamheodongcheon Campsite. Again there was no tent for our friends to rent. So they slept in our tent once again. They still didn’t help put up the tent or take it down the next day. But on the bright side, there was a GS25 Mart nearby to buy food and supplies; well, at least for Mark and me to do the buying.

At the GS25 Mart Mark and I bought more supplies. The girlfriend finally started to feel bad and she announced that she would buy the paper plates for tonight’s dinner. The boyfriend bought himself a small bag of chips. After Mark and I cooked dinner and cleaned up Mark said that he was still hungry and was thinking about going back down to the GS25 Mart. The girlfriend said, “Oh, here is a bag of chips. We can share it!”

The boyfriend flew into a little rage. “I paid for those! They aren’t yours to offer to other people!” The girlfriend meekly retracted her offer of chips then muttered, “We’re sleeping in their tent. The least we can do is give them some stupid chips.”

All to ourselves

The campsite was huge and because it was Chuseok, there weren’t tons of people around. There was one weird guy who seemed quite fascinated by us. He came by with his dog and just sat in our camping area and stared at us. We tried saying hi, but he wouldn’t speak. Later on he sat on the street across from us and sang. We joined in and it seemed to frighten him. What an odd guy.

The shower facilities here were locked, but the washing station did have running water.

Houston we have a problem; a sexy problem…

He’s too cheap for  that; let’s to it!

The next day, day 3, Mark and I were tired of lugging around our gear, paying for everyone’s meals, and dealing with the boyfriend’s little hissy fits. We didn’t want to spend hours upon hours at the terminal asking for directions. So when we saw something interesting on the bus ride to the terminal we asked to be let off.

All four of us walked over the ticket counter to find out what the building was. It was a space center. It was mainly for kids. And, for Korea, it was a bit expensive at about 13USD for an adult ticket. “Does it have air-conditioning,” one of us asked. It did.

Welcome!

Boyfriend, peered into the building suspiciously. I looked and Mark and he looked at me. I just knew whether or not Mark and I stayed would depend on the boyfriend.

Boyfriend – “It’s just really expensive.”

Mark – “Yeah. For Korea. We know.”

Me – “…and it’s for kids. We’re not kids…”

Boyfriend – “I’m not going to pay for that!”

Mark and me – “Alright then. We’ll stay. We’ll see you again some other time.”

Oh No! I don’t know how to fly this thing!

We went to the cafeteria first. There we could see the couple standing across the street. We ate while we watched them wait for the bus. Once the bus came we felt free. We vowed never to go anywhere with them again. I understand wanting to save money, but I don’t understand mooching off your friends.

You might wonder why we didn’t say anything to them or why we didn’t just eat our food and ignore them. I can’t speak for Mark, but I hate confrontations and awkward situations. Plus I didn’t realize we were being used until the second day when they had turned down several opportunities to return our generosity.

I did not expect them to pay to stay in our tent, but I was really disappointed that they didn’t offer to help take down the tent, carry the tent (even for a couple of minutes) the next day, or put it up the next evening. I was also expecting that the next meal they would say something like, “Okay guys, the next meal is on us.” Even after the trip I thought that surely they would call us up and invite us out for dinner and offer to pick up the tab. But that never happened.

In fact several weeks later they “invited” us to a concert where Boyfriend was a singer for one of the many talentless bands. We were to listen to hours of horrible heavy metal and then join them for dinner afterwards. What we didn’t realize until we got there was that we had to pay for our own tickets. As a singer, he could have gotten us free tickets, but Boyfriend never got around to picking them up and they were given away to random people walking around near the venue.

When it was time for dinner they took us to a fancy, and expensive, restaurant. Mark and I looked at the prices and decided to split an appetizer. The couple ordered something from the main menu. I was impressed. Where did the cheapskates we’d come to love go? Then they pulled out several coupons and received free meals.

YEAH!! We only have to pay for our own stuff now!!

Once they left, we had a great time. After the space center we waited for another bus, any bus, to show up. We hopped on it and got off whenever we saw something interesting. This method was far less stressful than trying to plan out destinations. We saw a few other sites before heading home and crossing the couple off our to-invite-on-trips list.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Ganghwa-do
(강화도)

How to Get There:

  • 37°44’22.6″N 126°29’23.9″E

From Seoul:

1- Via Gimpo Airport:

  1. Go to Gimpo Airport on lines 5, 9, and the Airport line.
  2. Go to the international terminal where the bus stops are.
  3. You should wait at gate #1 for bus #3. The ride cost a little over 3,000KRW from Gimpo Airport. You can use your T-money but you must first tell the bus driver your destination.

You can catch this bus at other stops in Seoul and Gimpo.

  • Here is a picture of the stops in Hangul.
  • Here is a picture of the time table in Hangul. It’s on the second row.

Get off at the last stop, Ganghwa Bus Terminal.

2- Via Bupyoung Station:

  1. Go to Bupyoung Station on Seoul line 1 and Incheon line 1.
  2. Go to the underground mall and through exit 23. Walk straight.
  3. Look for a blue #90 bus’ bus stop. They come by pretty often, so don’t worry if you miss it. The ride cost a little over 3,000KRW. You can use your T-money but you must first tell the bus driver your destination (Ganghwa-do).

Get off at the last stop, Ganghwa Bus Terminal.

3- Find a red buses that go to Ganghwa. Google says it’s #3000 and you can catch it from Hongdae Station.

Notes:

  • Do not swim too far out in the water on the north side of this island. The land on the other side is North Korea!

Dongmak Beach
(동막해수육장)

How to Get There:

  • 37°35’37.7″N 126°27’28.4″E

From Ganghwa Bus Terminal:

First go to the Tourist Information counter and get some maps; one in English and one in Korean. Use your maps to point to where you want to go when talking to cabbies or bus drivers.

  • Take a taxi
    • This should cost about 25,000KRW and it takes about an hour.
  • Take the #13 or #14 bus
    • Ask a bus driver which bus to take. Both buses come by quite infrequently. Don’t bother asking the lady at the ticket booth. She will only tell you the wrong bus number and get you hopelessly lost.
    • The bus may be parked at gate 10, any of the gate 11’s, gate 12, or gate 13.
      • For some odd reason there are 3 gate 11’s.
    • When you board the bus tell the driver where you want to go. He will stop right there whether it was a stop or not.
    • This should cost about 900KRW and take about an hour, but you might have to wait up to an hour and a half for the bus at the terminal.
  • Once at Dongmak beach take any bus, going in any direction to get back to the terminal. They make a big circle so the direction doesn’t matter.

Notes:

  • There are many restaurants and convenient stores across the street to buy supplies.
  • The Family Mart is open 24 hours a day and most of the restaurants open until late.
  • Oh… and there is a noraebang!
  • The section for tents has stones which can make sleeping quite uncomfortable. We put our tent on the small cemented area even though we have an air mattress.
  • Camping on the sandy part of the beach is impractical since the beach is narrow at high tide and slopes.

Ganghwa Dolmen
(강화지석묘군)

How to Get There:

  • 37°46’23.7″N 126°26’13.5″E

From Ganghwa Bus Terminal:

  • Take the #1 bus
  • Ask a bus driver which bus to take. Don’t bother asking the lady at the ticket booth. She will only tell you the wrong bus number and get you hopelessly lost.
  • This bus will be parked next to gate 1, but not at gate 1.
  • When you board the bus tell the driver where you want to go. He will stop right there whether it is a stop or not.
  • This should cost about 900KRW.

To get back just stand on the side of the road and flag down any bus. Unlike Seoul, you don’t have to be at a bus stop to get a bus driver to stop for you. When a bus stops, stick your head through the door and ask, “Terminal?” If he goes to the terminal he’ll nod his head and let you on. If not, he’ll mutter something in Korean and not let you board the bus.

Cost:

Free

Phone:

  • 032-933-3624

Notes:

  • You will be disappointed if you spend 3 hours to get here. This is a nice site, if it is one of many sites you visit, but not if you are planning to make it the main attraction.

Seokjo Buddha Standing Statue
(석조여래입상)

How to Get There:

  • 37°46’50.8″N 126°25’32.7″E

From Ganghwa Bus Terminal:

  • Take the #1 bus
  • Ask a bus driver which bus to take. Don’t bother asking the lady at the ticket booth. She will only tell you the wrong bus number and get you hopelessly lost.
  • This bus will be parked next to gate 1, but not at gate 1.
  • When you board the bus tell the driver where you want to go. He will stop right there whether it was a stop or not.
  • This should cost about 900KRW.

From Ganghwa Dolmen

  • Walk towards the road 48, the road the bus that brought you there drove on. Stand with your back to the Ganghwa Dolmen and turn right. Keep walking until you see a sign for the carved standing Buddha.

To get back just stand on the side of the road and flag down any bus. Unlike Seoul, you don’t have to be at a bus stop to get a bus driver to stop for you. When a bus stops, stick your head through the door and ask, “Terminal?” If he goes to the terminal he’ll nod his head.

Cost:

Free

Hours:

Always available for viewing.

Notes:

  • You will be disappointed if you spend 3 hours to get here. This is a nice site, if it is one of many sites you visit, but not if you are planning to make it the main attraction.
  • Before we walked up the hill to the Buddha and the pagoda we left our bags at the little store at the fork in the road. The lady who owned the store watched our stuff and didn’t take any money for it, even though we offered to pay. We did, however, buy water and snacks from her when we got back.

Five-Storied Pagoda
(오층석탑)

How to Get There:

  • 37°46’46.2″N 126°25’17.9″E

From Ganghwa Bus Terminal:

  • Take the #1 bus
  • Ask a bus driver which bus to take. Don’t bother asking the lady at the ticket booth. She will only tell you the wrong bus number and get you hopelessly lost.
  • This bus will be parked next to gate 1, but not at gate 1.
  • When you board the bus tell the driver where you want to go. He will stop right there whether it is a stop or not.
  • This should cost about 900KRW.

From Seokjo Buddha Standing Statue:

  • If you haven’t seen the sign already on your way to the Buddha statue, just go back to road 48 and walk going west, or away from the Ganghwa Dolmen. You should see a sign soon.

To get back just stand on the side of the road and flag down any bus. Unlike Seoul, you don’t have to be at a bus stop to get a bus driver to stop for you. When a bus stops, stick your head through the door and ask, “Terminal?” If he goes to the terminal he’ll nod his head.

Cost:

Free

Hours:

Always available for viewing

Notes:

  • You will be disappointed if you spend 3 hours to get here. This is a nice site, if it is one of many sites you visit, but not if you are planning to make it the main attraction.

Hamheodongcheon Campsite
(함허동천야영장)

How to Get There:

  • 37°36’41.0″N 126°27’09.7″E

The directions are the same as the ones to get to Dongmak beach. They are both on the same road. If you can’t pronounce the name, just say, “camping” and point to your map.

From Dongmak Beach

  • Take any bus going left to right when your back is to the beach . Tell the driver where you want to go.
  • The entrance is not very obvious, so again, make sure to tell the bus driver where you want to go.

Cost:

The picture above might be helpful if you can read Korean. The smaller fees are for entrance to the park. There is a mountain you can climb to visit a temple. Camping overnight cost a bit more. Mark paid about 9,000KRW for him and me. Having camped in Korea before  I think the price is calculated like this:

  • 2 adult entrance tickets: 1,500KRW X 2 = 3,000KRW (We were of a group of less than 30 people.)
  • 2 adults with own tent:   3,000KRW X 2 = 6,000KRW

  • total   = 9,000KRW (about 9USD)

That’s how it worked at Muuido.

There might be tents to rent, but don’t count on it. It might be something that’s only available in the summer.

Hours:

Always open

Notes:

  • There is a 24 hour Family Mart right by the entrance where you can buy food and supplies.
  • There is a restaurant or two within the campsite, but they aren’t always open. Unfortunately we didn’t see a noraebang.
  • The further you go up the better the campsites get.
  • There are wooden platforms you can put your tent on, but you don’t have to use them.
  • You can pitch your tent anywhere you find space.

Oktokki Space Center
(옥토끼 우주센터)

How to Get There:

From Hamheodongcheon Campsite:

  • Take any bus heading towards the main bus terminal (the one you go to when you want to go to Incheon.)
  • Tell the driver where you want to go.

From Dongmak beach:

  • Stand at the bus stop on the side of the road that the beach is on. Flag down any bus.
  • Tell the driver where you want to go.

From Ganghwa Terminal:

  • Take bus #14 tell the driver where you want to go.

I’m not sure if there is a bus stop at the space center, but buses on this island seem to stop whenever someone flags them down or wherever someone needs to get off.

Address:

1026 Buleun-myeon Duun-ri, Ganghwa-gun, Incheon
South Korea

Phone:

  • 032-937-6918

Website

Cost:

Adults = 13,000KRW

Hours:

  • 9:30 ~ 19:00

Notes:

  • This park seems to be for kids, but it was on road 84 and easy to get to from our campsite. We had fun there and spent about 3 hours playing and taking photos.
  • If you go, try the 4 season sledding in the back.
  • The place has air conditioning!

Gwangseongbo
(광성보)

How to Get There:

  • 37°39’54.0″N 126°31’48.4″E

From Ganghwa Terminal:

  • This bus will be parked at gate 6 and will not have a number. This bus runs very infrequently.
  • Tell the bus driver where you want to go.

To go back to the terminal take any bus that stops at the bus stop whether it goes to the terminal or not. If it doesn’t go to the terminal get off when the bus gets on road number 84. Right before the turn to road 84 you will see, on the right side, an ad for a restaurant of a guy making noodles.

Once on road 84 stop any bus headed north, (going in the direction opposite of the bus you got off of).

Website

Cost:

Adult: 1,100KRW

Notes:

  • There is muddy fishing area nearby.
  • Bring your fishing rod

Map:

Posted in Ganghwa, Incheon, South Korea | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Kid on a Ledge

Posted by Heliocentrism on September 30, 2009

Walking Around

This is not a travel entry, but just a weird thing that happen to Mark and me.

Late Sunday morning, while at Mark’s apartment, I was sitting at his desk wasting time on Facebook. I noticed a head bobbing around outside the window. I thought, at first, that someone was fixing something outside. But the person was just pacing outside on the ledge.

Just a kid going for a walk, on a ledge…

Mark and I got up and looked outside to see what was going on. That’s when we realized that the person was just a little kid. He ran over to the corner of the building. Mark’s apartment is on the 6th floor so I panicked thinking that this kid might fall to his death.

I had no idea what to do. I don’t speak Korean. How would I explain to someone what was going on before the kid falls off the ledge? I quickly took some pictures to make it easier for us to explain the situation to the security guard and get help.

Mark to the rescue!

I really didn’t have to think about this for very long, because Mark climbed out the window during my little panicky episode. He shuffled over to the kid and picked him up. Mark said the boy struggled a bit in his arms.

Mark managed to carry him over to our window and handed him over to me. I picked him up and brought him into Mark’s apartment. The kid was wearing diapers and he had a bloody foot. He looked to be about six years old. He was obviously a mentally challenged kid.

I took his hand and led him through the apartment and out the door. I hoped that he would lead me to his apartment so I could tell his mom about what happened. As we walk through the hallway I saw another kid. I ask the other kid, “Is this your little brother?”

The older kid said nothing; not even in Korean. He took the diapered child’s hand and walked him to their apartment. The parents weren’t home. Mark came over. He had his coworker on the phone to translate. We tried talking to the older brother, but he never spoke a word.

It’s a long way down.

Mark went downstairs to tell the building’s security guard what happened. I stayed upstairs. I tried to get the older brother to close the window in his apartment. He just stared at me blankly. I began to think that he too might be mentally challenged.

Then I noticed the diapered child climbing out the window again. I pushed the other boy out of the way; he was standing at the door. I ran over to the window and grabbed the younger kid. Then I locked the window myself.

Mark’s talk with the security guard didn’t go well. The guard thought he was reporting the kid as a peeping Tom. Even with the coworker as a translator, he couldn’t make the security guard understand how dangerous the situation was. The guard just couldn’t be bothered.

When the mom finally came home we tried to talk to her. By this time we didn’t have a translator so we showed her the photos I had taken. She thanked us.

Posted in Incheon, South Korea | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

The Flu of Swines

Posted by Heliocentrism on September 29, 2009

September 26, 2009

All Pictures

Stop H1N1!

Swine Flu

Koreans are scared of swine flu. I’m not sure how the everyday Americans feel about swine flu, but here people are scared. There have been many cancellations of public outdoor events for fare of spreading the illness.

Personally I think that swine flu is a great thing for Korea.  I remember Korea one year ago. Let’s say you want to use the bathroom. It doesn’t really matter where you use the facilities, you run into the same problem. There is either no soap or you have to use a  bar of soap that is attached to the sink via a metal rod.

Sometimes the soap looks clean, but most of the time it’s look like the place where all evil originated. I still haven’t figured out whether it is better to use or not use the dirty bar of soap to wash my hands.

soap on a rod the clean version

I don’t want to shake hands.

I always wash my hands. I either use the dirty soap, my own soap that I keep in my purse when I remember to bring it, or wash with only water. Most people, on the other hand, don’t even give the sink as much as a slight glance. They open their bathroom stall and head straight for the door.

hand washing instructions

Snot Rockets in Flight

Some other things in Korea that have ended since a year ago are lots of open mouth coughing, open mouth sneezing, spitting, and snot rockets. I can’t even tell you the number of times I have almost been spat on or almost been the victim of a snot rocket attack. For those of you who don’t know what a snot rocket is, look at the video below.

Now there is liquid soap in more bathrooms and hand sanitizers in many shops and fast food restaurants. In many public bathrooms there are new posters that give instructions on proper hand washing. Sadly, there is still a lot of uncovered coughing mouths and I don’t think that people will ever stop spitting everywhere.

Along with the hundreds of hand sanitizer machines, there are also many “fluguns” installed where crowds are expected. This is a device that is supposed to kill flu germs, I think. I doubt that it works, since after being “flugunned” about three times in Songdo I had a cold the next day.

Flugunnin’

International Fair

Whenever I see the word “international” in Korea, I become skeptical. Take for example the international restaurant area right outside Lotte Word. They have a Japanese restaurant, a bad Chinese restaurant, a Korean version of an Italian restaurant, and about 1,001 Korean restaurants.

African Art

So I was quite surprised at the fair when I saw countries like India, Turkey, and Sweden being represented. Africa was lumped together as if it were one giant country and for a minute, as we walked through the “pathway of Africa,” I thought it would be nothing but bare-breasted women with baskets on their heads, but the African Tribes Living Hall did have some nice African art and pottery exhibits.

The European Culture exhibit was a bit off. It seems that, to the maker of the exhibit, European Culture was just any and everything that wasn’t Korean. It was just a grouping of rooms with a bunch of stuff randomly placed and thrown about. Among the example of Europeanism was a gramophone, a moose head, and several Barbie dolls, one Mexican and one Native American. (All these things are products or animals of North America.)

lame robot

Kekkou desu (No Thank you), Mr. Robot

We were excited to check out the Robot Science Pavilion down High-Tech Plaza, but it too was disappointing. They did have robots that kids could control, but most of them were broken and needed maintenance. As I walked through the building I felt as if the designers of this exhibit just gave up and started putting up movie posters.

Other than the gross misunderstanding of most non-Korean culture and totally misleading Robot Science Pavilion the fair was nice. There were carni rides and a short fireworks show at night to top everything off. I really hope they do this again next year!

All Pictures


 

South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Songdo
(송도)

How to Get There:

  • 37°23’35.3″N 126°38’04.6″E

From Seoul:

Website

Notes:

This is a really nice place to just walk around.


Global Fair & Festival

How to Get There:

From Seoul take Seoul subway line #1 to Bupyoung then transfer to Incheon line #1. Get off at Central Park Station.

Websites:

Cost:

  • Adult      18,000KRW
  • Student  13,000KRW
  • Child      10,000KRW

After 18:00 tickets cost 8,000KRW for adults.

Hours:

  • August 7, 2009 – October 25, 2009
  • 9:00 – 21:00 Check the web site for more information

Notes:

The fair is no longer in operation. Maybe they will have another one in the future, but I doubt it. It was awesome while it lasted…

Map:

Posted in Incheon, Songdo, South Korea | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Island in The Sun

Posted by Heliocentrism on August 29, 2009

August 8, 2009

All Pictures

Muuido

A day at the beach with no water

It was a nice sunshiny day. There was fun. There was sand. There were even lots of little naked kids running around. The only thing that was really missing was the water. The tide goes out really far on the east coast of Korea leaving behind brown sludge. Someone said that the sand on most Korean beaches is imported from China. That seems plausible because the sand under the sea was not sand at all.

Beach – Water = This

This was another trip planned by William. When William plans a trip there is lots of food, specifically grilled food. William has a Costco card and can get his hands on fine American cuisine like burgers and nacho cheese.

Grill Master William

But if you don’t have a Costco card and a William to carry all the food to the beach for you and cook it too, you can simple eat at the restaurant at the beach. They serve seafood and galbi (갈비). If you want to grill your own, the corner store in the park sells raw samgyeopsal (삼겹살) and mini grills. They also sell anything you would ever need except tents, so don’t bring anything that would make your backpack too heavy.

“I went horseback riding in Korea.” Now that is a true statement.

Look, Horsies!

There were dune buggies to rent and ride, but they didn’t seem like much fun. The area designated for riding was very restricted. Maybe when the beach isn’t so crowded they let you go further.

We heard rumors that there were horses at the beach and set off looking for them. At first we couldn’t see them, but we could sure smell them. They stunk!

If you ride horses a lot this wouldn’t be worth it for you. I just wanted to get on a horse to get my picture taken, to say that I rode a horse in Korea, and so that I could have something to blog about.

It cost 10,000KRW for the short ride and 20,000KRW for the long ride, though the long ride wasn’t very long. I took the short ride which involved the owner running along with the bridle of the horse in hand.

The 5 minute ride was totally worth 10,000KRW. Maybe…

They don’t need no stinkin’ tent! We’ll just sleep around this chair.

Island in The Sun

The next morning when I woke up, I saw all the people who slept at the beach without shelter. They didn’t seem to suffer any ill effects from roughing it the night before. In fact, they slept in later than I did. But it might have been because they were still pretty drunk.

Brittney and I were the only 2 awake/sober women on the beach that morning. We noticed that William left a lot of food from Costco at the beach. There were hot dogs, hot dog buns. and soda cans everywhere. We felt that since the people from our group left them and they were now gone, it was our responsibility to clean it up.

As we were cleaning up we noticed an unopened jar of salsa sauce. Then she found an unopened jar of cheese dip. Then I found a jar of dill pickles. Then we found more salsa and cheese dip and cans of soda; all unopened. My first thought was how to get this stuff back to William; he left before sunset the previous night. But then Brittney said that it was too much trouble to give it back to William, besides he left it here. He wanted us to have it. Since we were the only ones to clean up, we should divide it between us and keep it.

Her logic seemed sound to me.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Muuido
(무의도)

How to get there:

  • 37°23’06.6″N 126°24’32.0″E

From Seoul:

Go to Incheon Airport. To get to the airport you can either take an airport limousine which costs about 8,000KRW depending on where you get on or take the subway and transfer to the airport line. The airport line is a bit more expensive than the other subway lines. It costs about 4,500KRW to use. You can use your T-money card on both the airport subway line and the airport limousine for a discount.

In the future Incheon Airport will not be the last stop. They are building a new parking lot and the line will someday end there. But until they do, you will have to get off at Incheon Airport and walk over to the departures and arrival area.

Go to the 3rd floor and stand between sections 5 & 6. You can use your T-money card to take bus #222 to the Jam Jin Ferry Terminal (잠진도산작천). This bus comes by once an hour and it will be beyond packed during the summer.

There is heavy traffic during the peak season so if when you get to the little bridge, the bus isn’t moving much, get out and walk. You’ll get to the ferry faster.

The Ferry to Muiido

The ferry to Muuido cost 3,000KRW for individuals and 20,000KRW for cars. It doesn’t matter how many people are in the car. The trip is free coming back.

Make sure to have a 1,000KRW note for the bus ride to the beach and another one to come back to the ferry. The bus on Muuido island doesn’t give change and you can’t use your T-money card.

Cost:

To enter the beach it costs 2,000KRW for an adult. If you bring your own tent you have to pay an extra 5,000KRW per tent in addition to the entrance fee. No one checks that you’ve paid your tent fee once you get in though. (I am in no way condoning skipping out on paying the tent fee, but if you manage to get in without paying don’t freak out.)

Heated Bungalows for rent

There are bungalows for rent along the beach. They are very small and seem to be worth it more in the spring or fall since they have heated floors. Most people who did not have tents just slept under the stars on nice summer nights. Well, most of the foreigners did… well, mostly the drunk ones.

I don’t know how much the bungalows cost.

There are showers that cost 2,000KRW to use. They’re not that bad. It seemed to me that most of the people there used the free foot washing area to do all their bathing. If you are not Korean and you plan to do this be prepared to be stared at.

Hours:

There was a time when the gate was closed and no one new could enter the park, but I don’t know what time that was.

Notes:

The bus on Muuido Island does not give change or use T-Money cards. You need to use exact change for each ride. It cost 1,000KRW per person per ride. You will need a 1,000KRW note going and another one leaving.

Maps:

Posted in Incheon, Muuido, South Korea | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Lonely Island

Posted by Heliocentrism on August 28, 2009

June 20, 2009

All Pictures

Taken by William

Sa Seung Bong Do is my favorite place in Korea.

What I heard is that the island belongs to some lady who wants to keep it undeveloped. She does, from time to time, allow people to rent the island for camping purposes. There is a care taker there who stays in a little cabin, but other than that the place is deserted. You can rent tents, but you have to pick them up from Seung Bong Do, the island you go to before going to Sa Seung Bong Do.

Sa Seung Bong Do Loves signs

Mark and I were not among the people who rented tents. I had seen a nice 2-person tent at Lotte Mart a few weeks earlier and bought it. It’s a lovely blue tent that’s pretty easy to set up and tall enough for me to stand in.

The first day of our trip we found our spots and set up our individual tents and the community tent. It was a very beautiful island, but we could not see it. It rained all day creating a heavy fog. It gave everyone a feeling of awe at being in such a wonderful place and misery because everything was cold and wet.

starting fire in the rain

Fire

The rain also made everyone a bit moody. Mark decided that he had had enough with just sitting around and being wet. He talked a couple other guys into helping him build a fire in the rain. Everyone else said that it couldn’t be done. “You can’t make a fire with wet wood.” I think that even Mark didn’t believe it was possible. He was just too bored not to build a fire.

They started out with paper cups and chopsticks for kindling. They drowned it in lighter fluid then added wood to it. They, one by one, ran off into the forest to get more wet wood for the fire. In just one hour they had a roaring fire going.

Fire for the people

The fire seemed to draw people out of their tents and the great cooking began. We had burgers, hot dogs, and Hobo Stew. The stew was the idea of Susan. You make a pocket out of foil paper, add water, vegetables, meat, and whatever else you would like, season, fold up shut, and place in the fire to cook.

At night many people got drunk and sat around the fire singing songs and playing a guitar. Things can get crazy on a lonely island and several people got hurt. It wasn’t anything serious, just a bruise here and a cut there; nothing a good first aid kit couldn’t handle.

The next day there was no rain, just sunshine and happiness. I was one of the first people up and one of the first to see the mess left after a night of drinking. As I, along with a few other people, cleaned up we found cameras, flashlights, and underwear sticking out of the sand.

People looking for their stuff

The rest of the morning was spent frolicking in the water and running way out to sea. The tide goes out very far on the east coast of Korea. It leaves interesting ridges on the sea floor which feels really nice on the feet when you walk across it.

A Funeral for a Pancake

We did have a lot of fun goofing around while making breakfast after the clean up. Our horse-play resulted in a casualty for one little pancake. We couldn’t just throw it away; we had to make a whole event of it!

Sa Seung Bong Do

Island in the Sun

It was sad to leave. Although I had only been there for about 24 hours I really fell in love with the island. I must get an island of my very own someday.

All Pictures


 

South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Sa Seung Bong Do
(사승봉도)

How do get there:

  • 37°09’14.5″N 126°19’18.1″E

The easiest way to get there is to join meetup.com, find William, and beg him to organize another trip to Sa Seung Bong Do. I don’t know who William called to arrange a stay on the deserted island, but I do know how to get there from Seoul.

From Seoul

  • Take the line 1 subway to Incheon station. That’s Incheon station, not Incheon Airport. Don’t get the two confused; they are not near each other at all. Once at Incheon station take bus #720 to Yeonan Budu Ferry Terminal. It’s a blue bus.
  • Another way is to take bus #1600 from Seoul station. This one is a red bus. You can get to it by going through exit 2 of Seoul station and walking to where all the red buses stop. This bus also stops near Hongdae Subway Station.

 

From the ferry terminal in Incheon

  • You can get a ticket for a 2 hours boat ride to Seong Bong Do (승봉도), another island off the coast of Incheon. Now, this is where William worked his magic. He hired a couple of boats to take our group to the island of Sa Seung Bong Do.
  • According to a sign on the island you should call 017-344-4089 to reserves a boat. I think the boat ride costs 15,000KRW for adults and 5,000 for kids. So give that a try.

Website:

Websites that might be helpful in getting you to Sa Seung Bong Do

Website that might be helpful in getting you to Seung Bong Do (the adjacent island)

Cost:

I have no idea. William set everything up and he priced everything to include food.

Hours:

There might be seasonal restrictions on when people can stay on the island.

Notes:  Camping Equipment in Korea

If you are buying camping equipment in Korea during the summer, you are in luck. Every halfway decent grocery or department store (Lotte Mart, E-Mart, Home Plus, etc) will have a camping section. They will sell both name brand expensive stuff and the store brand cheaper stuff. They’re all good, so don’t feel like you have to spend a lot of money for good equipment. I bought a decent 2-person tent (that could actually fit 4 people) for about 40USD.

If summer has just passed or it’s not quite summer yet, too bad. The only places that sell camping things at these times are camping stores. They only sell high-end camping gear for hard-core campers with lots of money. My advice is to just not camp until summer. Stay in love motels or rent your equipment when possible, until you see the camping gear in the department stores.

Honestly, it would be cheaper to order your camping stuff from Amazon.com (use the global shipping option)  than to buy most things for sale at any of the camping stores in Korea.

Map:

Click for Google maps

Posted in Incheon, Sa Seung Bong Do, South Korea | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

No Occupying While Stable

Posted by Heliocentrism on May 11, 2009

May 6 – 9, 2008

All Pictures

The Tian Ren: Panama’s finest!

Goodbye 한국

My next attempt to leave Korea was more successful. I had given myself more than enough time to get lost a couple of times, though I didn’t need it this time. I arrived at the Incheon port with 2.5 hours to spare.

They began boarding about one and a half hours before the schedule departure time of  1:00 pm and the gate closed at 12:30 pm. It took a long time for the boat to get out of the locks at the port of Incheon. It wasn’t until 3:30 pm that Korea could no longer be seen from aboard the ship.

Off to Panama?

It was very sad seeing Korea disappear in the horizon. I felt a mixture of sadness for leaving Korea and excitement for seeing new countries like Vietnam, Mongolia, and Finland just to name a few. Plus I would be seeing my mother and brother. It was almost a year since I saw either of them last.

My Bunk with the curtains closed

Anchors Aweigh! 

According to the boat company’s website the ride lasts 25 hours, but it took about 2 hours longer than that for my ride. I heard from a fellow passenger that his trip over to Korea from China took 29 hours.

On board, the boat has many things to make your voyage across the sea more tolerable. There is a main cafeteria that is open only during meal times. The food is okay and not expensive. You can pay in either Won or Yuan.

There is also a bar/restaurant that stays open later than the cafeteria. The food there tastes less like cafeteria food and more like kimbap shop food.

There was also a DVD room, a norae bang, and a sauna area in the shower rooms. For the kids there was a video game area next to a very sad casino that lacked gamblers.

Aboard the ship I didn’t see much of the people in the bunks next to and around mine. As expected, most people only went to their bunks when it was time to sleep and then they closed their curtains. I did manage to see a turquoise bracelet on a wrist that stuck out of a bunk of a snoring neighbor.

On a boat to China

Back on Solid Ground

I met two guys on the ship, a Canadian, Tim, who had just finished his contracted year teaching in Korea and an American, Brian, who was going back to work in China after vacationing in Korea. We were the only non-Asian people on the boat.

Once we were off the boat our group of three appointed Brian the navigator, and his duty was to get us to the bus stop where we would get the bus to Tianjin. Once on the bus we sat next to a lady with a turquoise bracelet.  As I sat there trying to think why the bracelet looked so familiar, the lady introduced herself.

She just happened to have had the bunk next to mine on the boat from Incheon and recognized me. She chatted the whole bus ride and then helped us get to the train station. The lady was Chinese and married to a Korean. She was on holiday in China to visit her folks. She was a lovely woman.

At the train station in Tianjin our group became a trio again when we said, “goodbye” to Brian. Mrs. Turquoise helped us to buy tickets to Beijing. It was a good thing she was there too. The Canadian, Tim, and I just watched the crowd at the ticket counter in disbelief. It was a mad group of people pushing and shoving to get tickets. I think a couple of burly men were even fighting for real over the last ticket to somewhere. But Mrs. Turquoise took our money and just walked right into the crowd and disappeared.

Tim looked at me and half heartedly suggested that we do something to help her. “Like what?” I asked. As he fumbled for a reply Mrs. Turquoise returned with 3 tickets to Beijing in hand. “These were the last tickets for the next train,” she said. “Did you get hurt in there?” Tim asked. Mrs. Turquoise looked at him as if she had no idea what he was talking about.

We followed her and boarded the train together. It was a nice train with clean bathrooms. I know, because after the bus ride I really had to go. Mrs. Turquoise led me to the bathroom section of the train. There were two unoccupied toilets, so we each took one.

When we got back to our seats some big bald baddie-looking guy and his bigger baddie-looking friend were in our seats. Tim said that he tried to explain that the seats were already taken, but they would not listen. Mrs. Turquoise show them our tickets, but they would not move. The men indicated that we should find some seats somewhere else. “You snooze, you lose!”

Mrs. Turquoise started yelling at them. I have no idea what she said to them, probably something about having their mothers hostage back in her dungeon. Shortly into her rant they shot up from their, umm ours seats and apologized for their huge lapse in judgement. They didn’t even bother with looking for another seat in our train car. They just ran to the next one. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprise if they hurled themselves from the train in fear, shame, or whatever feeling Mrs. Turquoise’s speech stirred in them.

In Beijing Mrs. Turquoise went to her parents’ home and it was just Tim and me. We ate dinner at a Chinese fast-food place and opened our Lonely Planet: China books to look for a place to stay. After discussing our options we picked the Qianmen Hostel near the Qianmen subway station.

This hostel was really nice and the location was very near everything I wanted to see. When I went back to Beijing the following month with my mom and brother, I stayed at the Qianmen Hostel again.

I did not see much of Beijing in May. One of the purposes of going to Beijing at that time was to get tickets on the Trans-Mongolian Express for my mom, brother, and me. But the tickets would not be sold until five days before departure. This was in 2008 and the summer Olympics would be in Beijing in three months. This screwed up a lot of train ticket sales for international journeys.

The next day I had breakfast with Tim and then never saw him again. I was heading down south to Vietnam and then going to Mongolia and he was going up north to Inner Mongolia then going to Vietnam. Unfortunately I don’t remember his real name but he just seemed like a “Tim” so in this blog he will be known as Tim.

Chinese Train

Off to Chongqing

After not getting train tickets to Mongolia, I went to the Beijing West Train Station and took the T9 to Chongqing which took about 25 hours. In that time I ate, slept, read books, and talked with whoever was around that could speak English or was willing to do a little miming.

There is a dining car on the T9, though I didn’t see it. I  completely forgot about meals and only remembered to eat when the lady with the meal cart came by. The meals cost about 30 Yuan and were composed of mostly meat with rice and some sort of vegetable. I usually like the Chinese train meals, although I don’t always know what I’m eating.

No Occupying While Stable?

Is this where I am to have my nervous breakdown?

On the train, I came across the most wonderful sign on a bathroom door. At first I had no idea what  it meant. The train had just pulled into a station and was parked. I really wanted to use the bathroom but the door was locked. I thought that someone was having a really hard time in there, but I was willing to wait. One of the ladies working on the train saw me waiting and she pointed to the sign. “Train stop, no open. Train no stop, open.”

Ahh… I see! Do not use while the train is parked…

All Pictures


Boat From Incheon, Korea to Tianjin (Tanggu), China

How to make reservations:

  • Call: +82-32-777-8260
  • for better English call the Korean Tourist Information line: +82-2-1330. This is for assistance only. The Korean Tourist information line is not associated with the boat company.

When you call they might tell you that you need to come down to the dock in person so they can photo copy your passport, visa to China, and other documents. You can ask them to let you fax or e-mail the information instead, and pay by credit card or bank transfer.

Website for Boat Company (in Korean. Use Google translator)

How to get to the dock:

  • 37°27’53.3″N 126°37’30.4″E
  1. Go to the Dong-Incheon Subway station.
  2. Take bus 23, 24, 17-1, or 3. There is a McDonald’s near the bus stop to get on the bus.
  3. You should get off the bus near another McDonald’s across the street from the port.

Notes:

  • Schedule
  • Departing Procedure
  • The cost of the ticket depends on which boat you take and the class of your accommodations. I took the cheapest ticket on the boat to Tianjin and it cost a little over 100USD. My Chinese visa cost more than my fair to China.
  • You must have a valid visa before entering China. To get a visa to China while in Korea you must go through a travel agent, not the Chinese embassy.

China 
(中国)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, train, boat, or bus
  • Make sure to get a visa before going to China.
  • Visas to China are expensive for people of some nationalities.
  • Getting a Chinese visa is not a quick process. Apply as soon as you can.

Phone:

Website:

There is a long list of websites that cannot be accessed while in China. Facebook and parts of Wikipedia are just two of them. As with everything, there are ways around it. There are sites that will let you get to Facebook and other sites for free for about 15 minutes, then you will have to pay.

My advice is to find a few of them and use them for free. Then use them again on a different computer. If you are in China for a long time, then you might want to invest in paying for the service. Ask friends living in China for the best deals.

Videos:

Books:

*These books by Jung Chang are banned in China. But I highly recommend reading Mao: The Unknown Story before going to Beijing.

Notes:

  • If you want an internet cafe look for this (网吧) on a sign.

Tianjin
(天津)
About this sound

How to get there:

  • 39°08’16.1″N 117°12’41.7″E (Tianjin Railway Station)

From Tanggu –

  • Take a bus or the train from Tanggu Railway Station or around that area.

I don’t remember exactly how to do it, since I was mostly following someone who lived in the area.

Just ask around.

Website

Notes:

Tanggu is a small port town on the out skirts of Tianjin. To get the Beijing you will need to get to the main city of Tianjin.


Beijing
(北京)

How to get there:

From Tianjin –

  • Take a train, regular or express, to Beijing Railway Station.

I don’t remember exactly how to do it, since I was mostly following someone who lived in the area.

Just ask around.

Website

Map:

Click for Google maps

Posted in Beijing, Incheon, Tanggu, Tianjin | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

I missed the boat

Posted by Heliocentrism on May 8, 2009

May 2, 2008

All Pictures

Incheon International Ferry Terminal 2

The First days of Joblessness

I had worked in Korea for a whole year and planned a big trip when my contract was completed. My last day of work was the last day of April 2008. The first stop of my trip was in China.

Traveling to China by plane is a bit expensive. I would be traveling for 2 months while jobless and at the end I would start looking for another job, so I had to think of a more economic route to China. From Incheon harbor there are boats that go to several ports in other countries. So I bought a ticket on the one that went to Tianjin.

It actually goes to Tanggu which is near Tianjin, but it is advertised as going to Tianjin. Well, I’m still not sure if Tanggu is near Tianjin the town, or in a county called Tianjin. I just know that there is a town called Tanggu and another town called Tianjin, both of which may or may not be in a county called Tianjin.

I was so geared up for my first day on my big trip, but not geared up enough to have planned my usual extra two hours for getting lost. I was so sure I knew exactly where to go since I had lived in Seoul for a whole year and that I would be okay getting there on time. I missed the boat because I took the wrong bus from the Dong-Incheon subway station to the ferry; a distance so close I could have walked.

If you ever plan on taking the boat to Tianjin, go to the Incheon International Ferry Terminal 2 at least one and a half hours before the schedule departure. Take bus number 3, 23, 24, or 17-1 from the Dong-Incheon subway station and show the bus driver the picture above or just get off near the McDonald’s. You could also take a taxi; it’s a $3 ride.

Directions and cost of a taxi

Korean Words of Sympathy

Once I figured out that I was on the wrong bus I got off and started to walk around aimlessly. I passed a port.  I really wanted it to be my port but it was a shipping yard for cargo.

I looked so distraught that a man gossiping with a security guard in the area decided to help me. I showed him my boat ticket and he instantly knew what to do. He told me to follow him. Although he had the odor of alcohol on his breath I didn’t have a better plan so I followed.

He hailed a cab and told me to get in. I sat in the back seat on the verge of crying. He sensed that I was troubled and spoke reassuring words to me. Or, at least I think he did. He did not speak any English. I only guessed this from the tone of his voice. He told the cabbie my plight and the driver also began to speak to me sympathetically.

Once we were at the dock the man paid the taxi. I offered to pay the whole or even part of the fare, but the man would not let me. He led me up to the boat company’s office and explained my situation to the people there. The boat, the Tian Ren, was schedule to leave in five minutes and I tried to convince the staff to hold the boat.

They could not do that. I started to feel a bit panicky. The lady just took my ticket, tore it up, and handed me a new ticket. The next boat to Tianjin would not leave Incheon for another four days.

Lady: “Just come back on Tuesday.”

Me: “What do I have to pay?”

Lady: “Pay? You already paid for your ticket. Just come back on Tuesday. Next time don’t be late.”

At first, I was just a little frustrated at how calm everyone else was, like me missing my boat was no big deal. Then I remembered that I didn’t actually have any appointments and that it really was no big deal. Then I moved on to being surprised that, even though it was completely my own foolish fault that I missed the boat, I could just take the next one without paying anything extra. And I was really lucky to meet a kind stranger who knew exactly where to go and what to do.

As a traveler I may not always be lucky in finding the best accommodations or transportation but I always manage to find the nicest people at just the right time.

Waiting for my friend to come home from work so I can have a place to stay.

So I calmed down and tried to think of something fun I could do with another weekend in Korea. I called up a friend for a place to stay and started to plan another mini-Korea-trip.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Boat From Incheon, Korea to Tianjin (Tanggu), China

How to make reservations:

Call:

  • +82-32-777-8260
  • For better English call the Korean Tourist Information line: +82-2-1330. This is for assistance only. The Korean Tourist information line is not associated with the boat company.

When you call they might tell you that you need to come down to the dock in person so they can photocopy your passport, visa to China, and other documents. You can ask them to let you fax or e-mail the information instead, and pay by credit card or bank transfer.

How to get to the dock:

  • 37°27’53.3″N 126°37’30.4″E
  1. Go to the Dong-Incheon Subway station.
  2. Take bus 23, 24, 17-1, or 3. There is a McDonald’s near the bus stop to get on the bus.
  3. You should get off the bus near another McDonald’s across the street from the port.

Notes:

  • Schedule
  • Departing Procedure
  • The cost of the ticket depends on which boat you take and the class of your accommodations. I took the cheapest ticket on the boat to Tianjin and it cost a little over 100USD. My Chinese visa cost more than my fair to China.
  • You must have a valid visa before entering China. To get a visa to China while in Korea you must go through a travel agent, not the Chinese embassy.

Map:

Click for Google maps

Boat From Incheon, Korea to Tianjin (Tanggu), China


 

Posted in Incheon, South Korea | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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