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Archive for the ‘Jeju City’ Category

Hangil Memorial Hall

Posted by Heliocentrism on December 4, 2009

November 27, 2009

All Pictures

The Japanese occupation of Korea

Occupation

The writing in this museum was mostly in Korean. When I got home I couldn’t find any information about this museum or the events that were described there. What I do know I’ve pieced together from books I’ve read, wikipedia.org, and a pamphlet I got from the museum with a tiny bit of English in it.*

* I lost the pamphlet in my move to Thailand so now I have no information about the museum. If anyone has any information about the resistance on Jeju island, please leave a comment below.

In the late 19th century many Western countries were colonizing Asian and African countries with the benefit of trade and economic power. Japan saw this and began to think. Would they soon be crippled economically? How long before some European country slithered its way into Tokyo like the British did to India?

Japan, in order to protect itself, needed to be bigger, stronger, and more modern. It needed help. It looked to Korea, its closest neighbor, but Korea, at the time was heavily influenced by China. Japan needed to get in and break that bond.

Japan wanted Korea to sign a treaty that would allow Japan to trade with Korea and, at the same time, disconnect Korea from its protection by China. This treaty was called The Treaty of Ganghwa. (Yes, the same island I love to go to for camping.)

Korea, having had bad experiences with the French occupying the island of Ganghwa, and some fights with the Americans over trade, didn’t want to enter any more trade agreements with anyone. The Japanese weren’t going to take no for an answer and forced the Koreans to sign the Treaty of Ganghwa. The Japanese got a better deal than the Koreans in the pact.

In 1905 Japan occupied Korea. In 1910 Korea was officially annexed. If you have read anything about Japan around the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, you know that Japan was sadistic and cruel to its enemies which was basically anyone not Japanese.

revenge (A Japanese soldier tied up by Koreans)

The Koreans did not like the annexation by Japan at all. There were many protests and demonstrations by the Koreans hoping to get the Japanese out of their country. The results of these protests were normally the imprisonment, beating, torture, and execution of the Korean resistors.

There are numerous accounted and unaccounted incidences of Japanese cruelty towards the people of Korea. The brutality was not saved for just protesters, though. If a village were thought to be hiding rebels, all the people in the area would be rounded up and killed. At the museum, we saw pictures of mass graves for murdered children. The Japanese also used many Koreans females as “comfort women“.

While under the Japanese rule, many roads and railway systems were built. This was done mainly to help the Japanese military with easy access throughout Korea to ensure Japan’s hold on the country. The roads are still used today and the railway system is the basis of today’s KTX.

Killing

The annexation of Korea ended in 1945 when Japan surrendered to the US. Korea was carelessly split into two countries. The north was under the protection and influence of Russia. And the south was under the protection and influence of the United States. None of these countries fully trusted any of the other countries.

To foreigners living in Korea, it would seem that the relationship between the Korea and Japan is strained with petty squabbles over tiny rocks in the Sea of Japan. Even the name “Sea of Japan” will cause anger to Koreans who say that the water should be called the “East Sea”.

But overall, relations between Korea and Japan are pretty good considering all that has happened between the two countries. Japan has never officially apologized for all the heinous and inhumane acts committed against the Korean people and it probably never will. Korea does trade and conduct business with Japanese companies, though you will still see people of the older generation picketing outside a Toyota or Honda dealership in Seoul.

The Japanese on the other hand adore K-pop, K-dramas, and Korean celebrities. They seem not to fully understand what happened with Korea, why Koreans dislike Japan, and a small fringe group of Japanese wonder why the Koreans in Japan don’t “go home”. But, Japan is this way with many countries. Unlike in Germany, students in Japan are not taught the negative aspects of Japan’s history, so most Japanese really don’t understand the cause of the tension.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible or most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets, muggers, or scam artists. Use common sense and you will be okay. Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

You should watch out when crossing the street, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and little old ladies will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 year and had a fantastic time.


Jeju Island
(제주도)

How to get there:

  • 33°30’26.8″N 126°29’32.8″E

From Seoul or Incheon:

  • By Boat fromthePortofIncheon
    • Depending on the time of year the fare to Jeju by boat will be cheaper than flying. But for us, traveling in the non-peak season for air travel, it was almost double the price of a cheap flight.
    • Cost: about 65,000KRW  one-way or more depending of the accommodations
    • Phone: 721-2173
  • ByPlanefromGimpo Airport
    • The best way to find cheap flights is to go wikipedia, look up the airport of your destination (Jeju International Airport) , find out what airlines fly there and from where. Then go down the list of airlines. Check out their website for flights costs. It doesn’t hurt to check out a few flight search engines like orbitz or priceline. We got our tickets from JejuAir with the help of a Korean speaker. They were less than 200,000KRW for 2 round trip tickets.

From outside Korea:

Notes:

  • Public transportation on Jeju Island is a real pain. Rent a car or scooter or bring a really interesting book.
  • Even though it is called the Hawaii of Korea, it is not warm there in the winter.

Gimpo Airport
(김포국제공항)

to get there:

  • 37°33’31.2″N 126°47’40.0″E

From Seoul

  • By Subway:
    • It’s easy, just go to Gimpo Airport subway station. If you live anywhere near a line 9 station, then you can take advantage of the express train to Gimpo.
  • By Bus:
    • All the airport limousines to Incheon Airport from Seoul stops at Gimpo Airport. Just look out for the bus stops with a plane on them. These buses cost 8,000KRW without a T-money card and 7,500KRW with one.

Website

Notes:

  • Gimpo Airport is not even close to being as nice as Incheon airport.
  • There is a movie theater over at the international terminal, but there is not much to do or eat once you go past the security check.
  • Make sure to eat before you go past the security check. There is a restaurant inside but every time I’ve seen it, it was either not opened yet, already closed, or there was nothing decent to eat.

Jeju City Bus Terminal
(제주종합터미널)

How to get there:

  • 33°29’58.9″N 126°30’53.7″E

From the Airport:

  • Take the #100 city bus.
  • They use the English word for “terminal” so when the stop is near you will hear the word in English.
  • You can use your T-Money card on all public buses on this island.

Address:

Jeju IntercityTerminal
2441 Ora 1-dong, Jeju City

Notes:


Yeha Guesthouse

How to get there:

  • 33°29’59.7″N 126°31’33.9″E
  • by taxi: 3 minutes from Jeju Airport (3,000KRW)
  • by bus:
    • take the #100, get off at Jeju bus terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.
  • fromJeju Port Terminal:
    • Take the #92 bus (1,000KRW),
    • get off at the Jungangno crossroads near the KB bank.
    • Then transfer to the #100 bus (1,000KRW)
    • get off at Jeju Bus Terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.

Address: 
Yeha Guesthouse 561-17,
Samdo 1-dong Jeju-si, Jeju Island

Phone:

  • +82-64-713-5505

Website:

E-Mail: yehaguesthouse@hotmail.com

Notes:

  • It’s way better than staying at a love motel.
  • It comes with free breakfast,
  • free internet,
  • free wireless internet,
  • free laundry,
  • free international phone calls,
  • free use of the kitchen…
  • Most of all, it’s clean.
  • If you book your stay through hostelworld you’ll get lower rates.

Hangil Memorial Hall
(제주항일기념관)

How to get there:

  • 33°32’29.8″N 126°38’34.6″E
  • Take the bus from Jeju City Bus Terminal gate 4.
  • Say that you want to go to Hangil Memorial in Jocheon.

Address: 1156 Jeju jocheoneup Jocheon-ri-gu

제주 제주시 조천읍 조천리 1156번지

Phone:

  • 064-783-2008

Cost:

  • 500KRW

Hours:

  • 9:00-18:00 Museum,
  • Outside area is always available
  • Closed Jan 1, Lunar New Year Holidays, Chuseok

Website

Note:

Map:

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Posted in Jeju, Jeju City, South Korea | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

No Bus!

Posted by Heliocentrism on November 28, 2009

November 26, 2009

All Pictures

No! You took all the good bits of a boyfriend and just left the head.

The Maddening Buses!!!

My mistake was this. I wanted to see Mini-mini Land, then the Trick Art Museum, then the Chocolate Museum. I looked at my map and the bus route information and thought that it could be done.

We would take the bus from gate 7 to Minimini Land then walk to Sangumburi. After that we would take a bus that left from gate 3 to the Trick Art Museum then catch that same bus to Pyoseon. From there we would catch the gate 4 bus to Seogwipo City bus terminal then get on the gate 11 bus to somewhere near the Chocolate Museum, then get a taxi the rest of the way.

I’ve never trusted that Snow White.

Everything was going well until we got to somewhere near Seogwipo. I’m not sure where we stopped. The bus driver told us that it was our stop and we needed to change buses to get near the Chocolate Museum. But when we got off and asked what bus to take next, everyone told us, “NO BUS!”

I’m not sure what was going on. Because a bus driver before told us that we would have “3 changee” which is what I worked out also by looking at my map and bus info. But at that one stop, no one wanted to help us.

Stop asking me for directions!

The man at the ticket counter couldn’t understand my English map. He pulled out a Korean map for me to show him where I wanted to go. I kept my English map open for me to compare the two and find the location on his map. But he kept pushing my English map aside and tried to knock it out of my hands. He seemed to have gotten annoyed and just shouted, “NO BUS”. After that, no one was very helpful. Later a new bus driver showed up and we asked him. He pointed out the bus that we should take. But by then it was too late. The museum closed at 5:00 pm.

All this could have been avoided if only there were a bus map and the buses had numbers. The island is too big to take taxis around. Most tourists just sign up for bus tours, but you don’t have much control over what you see and do with your time. I don’t like bus tours.

Mark in the mirror

If you go to Jeju, I recommend one of two things:

1. Rent a car.

2. Pick one bus per day. See all the stuff on that bus route and never change buses. And remember that most buses stop running around 21:00.

I also think that whenever you find a free map, you should take it no matter what language it is in. There are tons of attractions on this island and they can’t all fit on any one map. So every map leaves out many things.

Since I’ve spent most of this blog entry giving bus information and wining about the lack of bus route maps I think I should post some videos. This is to show that we did have loads of fun, when we weren’t waiting for buses.

MiniMiniLand:

The Trick Art Museum:

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Jeju Island
(제주도)

How to get there:

  • 33°30’26.8″N 126°29’32.8″E

From Seoul or Incheon:

  • By Boat fromthePortofIncheon
    • Depending on the time of year the fare to Jeju by boat will be cheaper than flying. But for us, traveling in the non-peak season for air travel, it was almost double the price of a cheap flight.
    • Cost: about 65,000KRW  one-way or more depending of the accommodations
    • Phone: 721-2173
  • ByPlanefromGimpo Airport
    • The best way to find cheap flights is to go wikipedia, look up the airport of your destination (Jeju International Airport) , find out what airlines fly there and from where. Then go down the list of airlines. Check out their website for flights costs. It doesn’t hurt to check out a few flight search engines like orbitz or priceline. We got our tickets from JejuAir with the help of a Korean speaker. They were less than 200,000KRW for 2 round trip tickets.

From outside Korea:

Notes:

  • Public transportation on Jeju Island is a real pain. Rent a car or scooter or bring a really interesting book.
  • Even though it is called the Hawaii of Korea, it is not warm there in the winter.

Gimpo Airport
(김포국제공항)

to get there:

  • 37°33’31.2″N 126°47’40.0″E

From Seoul

  • By Subway:
    • It’s easy, just go to Gimpo Airport subway station. If you live anywhere near a line 9 station, then you can take advantage of the express train to Gimpo.
  • By Bus:
    • All the airport limosine to Incheon Airport from Seoul stops at Gimpo Airport. Just look out for the bus stops with a plane on them. These buses cost 8,000KRW without a T-money card and 7,500KRW with one.

Website

Notes:

  • Gimpo Airport is not even close to being as nice as Incheon airport.
  • There is a movie theater over at the international terminal, but there is not much to do or eat once you go past the security check.
  • Make sure to eat before you go past the security check. There is a restaurant inside but every time I’ve seen it, it was either not opened yet, already closed, or there was nothing decent to eat.

Jeju City Bus Terminal
(제주종합터미널)

How to get there:

  • 33°29’58.9″N 126°30’53.7″E

From the Airport:

  • Take the #100 city bus.
  • They use the English word for “terminal” so when the stop is near you will hear the word in English.
  • You can use your T-Money card on all public buses on this island.

Address:

Jeju IntercityTerminal
2441 Ora 1-dong, Jeju City

Notes:


Yeha Guesthouse

How to get there:

  • 33°29’59.7″N 126°31’33.9″E
  • by taxi: 3 minutes from Jeju Airport (3,000KRW)
  • by bus:
    • take the #100, get off at Jeju bus terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.
  • fromJeju Port Terminal:
    • Take the #92 bus (1,000KRW),
    • get off at the Jungangno crossroads near the KB bank.
    • Then transfer to the #100 bus (1,000KRW)
    • get off at Jeju Bus Terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.

Address: 

Yeha Guesthouse 561-17, Samdo 1-dong Jeju-si, Jeju Island

Phone:

  • +82-64-713-5505

Website:

E-Mail: yehaguesthouse@hotmail.com

Notes:

  • It’s way better than staying at a love motel.
  • It comes with free breakfast,
  • free internet,
  • free wireless internet,
  • free laundry,
  • free international phone calls,
  • free use of the kitchen…
  • Most of all, it’s clean.
  • If you book your stay through hostelworld you’ll get lower rates.

Mini Mini Land
(미니미니랜드)

How to get There:

  • 33°26’00.1″N 126°40’28.0″E
  • From Jeju City Bus Terminal go to gate 7.
  • The bus driver will tell you where to get off if he knows where you’re going.

Cost:

  • 6,000KRW

Hours:

  • 8:30-19:30

Phone:

  • 064-782-7720

Notes:

The displays are supposed to be tourist attractions from around the world, but they had a hard time sticking to the theme.


Sangumburi
(산굼부리관리사무소)

How to get there:

Cost:

  • 3,000KRW

Hours:

  • Mar 1 – Jul 14     9:00 – 18:00
  • Jul 15 – Aug 31  9:00 – 19:00
  • Sept 1 – oct 31    9:00 – 18:00
  • Nov 1 – Feb 28   9:00 – 17:00

Phone:

  • 064-783-9900

Websites:

Notes:

Like most things in Korea, this involves hiking up a hill. But don’t worry it’s not a very big hill.


The Trick Art Museum
(트릭아트뮤지엄)

How to get there:

  • This museum is near the Seong Folk Village.
  • Take the bus from gate 7 or 3 from Jeju City bus terminal.

From Sangumburi

Cost:

  • 8,000KRW

Notes:

  • Your photos will look better if you turn off your flash.

Map:

Elephant land, Goblin Park, Minimini Land, Joy World, Sangumburi, Seongbuloren, Jeju pony town, reptile theme park, Seongeup Folk Village, Kim Jung-mun Aloe farm, Jeju folk Village

Posted in Jeju, Jeju City, Seogwipo City, South Korea | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Hairy Black Pig

Posted by Heliocentrism on November 25, 2009

November 25, 2009

All Pictures

caving fun

Women under water

Today was one of those “what we would have done had we known better” days. First we went to see the lava tubes. It was a long walk through the dormant volcano. Then we walked to the maze. It’s a short lovely walk. We spent the next 45 minutes getting lost and un-lost in the maze.

After all that maze walking I asked for directions to the Haenyeo Museum. As usual, I got the standard, what-the-hell-is-that look. I then had to spout out words like, “diving women”, “scuba woman”, and mime like a fool to get people to understand. Maybe my pronunciation is bad… I really need to learn more Korean, but I’m about to leave the country…

Since we couldn’t get directions to the Haenyeo Museum, we asked about Seopjikoji instead. One guy told me, “bus” then pointed out to the road. “Walk 30.” He meant that the walk was 30 minutes down the road. Mark and I were getting hungry at that point and we were not in the mood for another long walk. We knew that a bus goes to the Manjanggul cave and that it’s just a 10 minute walk away, so we went there. We looked at the bus schedule and saw that we had just missed the previous bus. The next one wouldn’t be around for another hour and a half.

There was a restaurant near the cave so we ate there while we waited for the bus. The restaurant’s kimchi jjigae was one of the best I’ve ever had. It was so meaty!

When we were done we strolled around the grounds. I laid down in the grass with a faint thought of a nap in my mind. Mark looked up and saw a bus. “Hey! That’s our bus!” There were 2 schedules apparently, and I had only looked at one.

Crying for a missed bus

Benny

We waited for the next bus. It drove right past Manjanggul’s entrance and never came in. It was now time for some walking to the main road. It was not a 30 minute walk; more like a 20 minute saunter. And it was quicker than waiting for the bus.

When we got on the main-road-bus we told the driver where we wanted to go. At our stop he told us to get a taxi the rest of the way. That’s when we met Benny. He was on our bus and headed in the same direction. As we made our way up Seopjikoji we found out that we were all staying at the same guesthouse. Mark and I decided that Benny’s first Korean meal should be not just samgyeopsal, but Jeju samgyeopsal.

We saw a few more things before heading back to the hostel. We asked the lady at the desk for a good samgyeopsal place. She wrote a note on a post-it for us to show the taxi driver. When we got to the restaurant I stuck the note to the bill on the table. The waitress saw it and thought it was the cutest thing. She kept giggling and showing it to all the other waitresses. I’m still not sure what was so entertaining about it.

Those little “spots” are actually hair

We ordered the famous black pig samgyeopsal that Jeju-do is known for. It was delicious, but they kept the skin on… turns out, black pigs are hairy.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Jeju Island
(제주도)

How to get there:

  • 33°30’26.8″N 126°29’32.8″E

From Seoul or Incheon:

  • By Boat fromthePortofIncheon
    • Depending on the time of year the fare to Jeju by boat will be cheaper than flying. But for us, traveling in the non-peak season for air travel, it was almost double the price of a cheap flight.
    • Cost: about 65,000KRW  one-way or more depending of the accommodations
    • Phone: 721-2173
  • ByPlanefromGimpo Airport
    • The best way to find cheap flights is to go wikipedia, look up the airport of your destination (Jeju International Airport) , find out what airlines fly there and from where. Then go down the list of airlines. Check out their website for flights costs. It doesn’t hurt to check out a few flight search engines like orbitz or priceline. We got our tickets from JejuAir with the help of a Korean speaker. They were less than 200,000KRW for 2 round trip tickets.

From outside Korea:

Notes:

  • Public transportation on Jeju Island is a real pain. Rent a car or scooter or bring a really interesting book.
  • Even though it is called the Hawaii of Korea, it is not warm there in the winter.

Gimpo Airport
(김포국제공항)

to get there:

  • 37°33’31.2″N 126°47’40.0″E

From Seoul

  • By Subway:
    • It’s easy, just go to Gimpo Airport subway station. If you live anywhere near a line 9 station, then you can take advantage of the express train to Gimpo.
  • By Bus:
    • All the airport limosine to Incheon Airport from Seoul stops at Gimpo Airport. Just look out for the bus stops with a plane on them. These buses cost 8,000KRW without a T-money card and 7,500KRW with one.

Website

Notes:

  • Gimpo Airport is not even close to being as nice as Incheon airport.
  • There is a movie theater over at the international terminal, but there is not much to do or eat once you go past the security check.
  • Make sure to eat before you go past the security check. There is a restaurant inside but every time I’ve seen it, it was either not opened yet, already closed, or there was nothing decent to eat.

Jeju City Bus Terminal
(제주종합터미널)

How to get there:

  • 33°29’58.9″N 126°30’53.7″E

From the Airport:

  • Take the #100 city bus.
  • They use the English word for “terminal” so when the stop is near you will hear the word in English.
  • You can use your T-Money card on all public buses on this island.

Address:

Jeju IntercityTerminal
2441 Ora 1-dong, Jeju City

Notes:


Yeha Guesthouse

How to get there:

  • 33°29’59.7″N 126°31’33.9″E
  • by taxi: 3 minutes from Jeju Airport (3,000KRW)
  • by bus:
    • take the #100, get off at Jeju bus terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.
  • fromJeju Port Terminal:
    • Take the #92 bus (1,000KRW),
    • get off at the Jungangno crossroads near the KB bank.
    • Then transfer to the #100 bus (1,000KRW)
    • get off at Jeju Bus Terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.

Address: 

Yeha Guesthouse 561-17, Samdo 1-dong Jeju-si, Jeju Island

Phone:

  • +82-64-713-5505

Website:

E-Mail: yehaguesthouse@hotmail.com

Notes:

  • It’s way better than staying at a love motel.
  • It comes with free breakfast,
  • free internet,
  • free wireless internet,
  • free laundry,
  • free international phone calls,
  • free use of the kitchen…
  • Most of all, it’s clean.
  • If you book your stay through hostelworld you’ll get lower rates.

Lava Tubes: Manjanggul Cave
(만장굴)

How to get there:

  • 33°31’42.5″N 126°46’17.3″E

From Jeju City Bus Terminal:

  • Take the bus at gate 4.
  • You can use your T-money card.
  • The first bus is at 6:00 and they leave in every 20 minutes after that.
  • You can get off when you hear the English ad for the Lava Tubes at the Manjanggul stop.
  • From here you have to cross the road and walk to the cave.
  • The bus driver might drop you off at Gimnyeong-ri. From here you can take a bus to the cave. The bus doesn’t come very often, so it might be better to go the Manjanggul bus stop.

How to leave:

  • Check the schedule for the bus that takes you to the main road.
  • If one isn’t coming in the next 20 minutes just walk to the main road.
  • Walk towards the Gimnyeong Maze Park.
  • There is only one bus that passes on that main road. It’s the bus you took to get to the cave.
  • The stop on the side closest to the ocean will get you a bus going to Jeju City Bus Terminal
  • The bus stop on the side opposite the ocean will get buses going to Seogwupo City Bus Terminal.

Address:

Jeju Special Self-Governing Province Jeju-si Gujwa-eup Donggimryeong-ri San 7-1

Phone:

  • +82-64-783-4818

Cost:

  • 2,000KRW

Hours:

  • 9:00-17:30

Notes:

  • Bring a jacket.
  • High heels are not allowed.

Gimnyeong Maze Park
(김녕미로공원)

How to get there:

  • 33°32’09.4″N 126°46’19.9″E

The directions are the same as the Manjanggul cave.

From Jeju City Bus Terminal:

  • Take the bus at gate 4.
  • You can use your T-money card.
  • The first bus is at 6:00 and they leave in every 20 minutes after that.
  • You can get off when you hear the English ad for the Lava Tubes at the Manjanggul stop.
  • From here you have to cross the road and walk to the maze.
  • The bus driver might drop you off at Gimnyeong-ri. From here you can take a bus to the cave. The bus doesn’t come very often, so it might be better to go the Manjanggul bus stop.

How to leave:

The directions are the same as the Manjanggul cave.

  • Check the schedule for the bus that takes you to the main road.
  • If one isn’t coming in the next 20 minutes just walk to the main road.
  • Walk away from the lava tubes.
  • There is only one bus that passes on that main road. It’s the bus you took to get to the cave or maze.
  • The stop on the side closest to the ocean will get you a bus going to Jeju City Bus Terminal
  • The bus stop on the side opposite the ocean will get buses going to Seogwupo City Bus Terminal.

Address:

Gujwa-eup Gimnyeong-ri, Jeju-si, Jeju-do South Korea

Phone:

  • +82-64-1330

Cost:

  • 3,300KRW

Hours:

  • 8:00-18:00

Seopjikoji
(섭지코지매표소)

How to get there:

  • 33°25’24.9″N 126°55’47.7″E
  • From Jeju City Bus Terminal
    • get on the bus at gate 4. Get off at Sinyang-ri and take a taxi or walk the rest of the way. Remember to tell the bus driver where you want to go so that he can tell you when to get off.
  • From the Manjanggul cave or Gimnyeong Maze Park
    • go to the main road, wait at the bus stop on the side opposite the ocean, and get on the bus that stops there. Get off at Sinyang-ri and take a taxi or walk the rest of the way. Remember to tell the bus driver where you want to go so that he can tell you when to get off.

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

  • always open to the public

Phone:

  • 06-782-2810

Sunrise Peak/Seongsan Ilchulbong
(성선일줄봉)

How to get there:

  • From Jeju City Bus Terminal
    • get on the bus at gate 4. Remember to tell the bus driver where you want to go so that he can tell you when to get off. You can walk the rest of the way.
  • From the Manjanggul cave or Gimnyeong Maze Park
    • go to the main road, wait at the bus stop on the side opposite the ocean, and get on the bus that stops there. Remember to tell the bus driver where you want to go so that he can tell you when to get off. You can walk the rest of the way.

Cost:

  • 2,000KRW

Hours:

  • Nov-Feb 1hr before sunrise to 20:00;
  • Mar-Oct 1hr before sunrise to 21:00

Phone: 064-783-0959

Map:

Posted in Jeju, Jeju City, South Korea | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Only 1 lighter

Posted by Heliocentrism on November 24, 2009

November 24, 2009

All Pictures

boo

Does this thing make my bag look big?

Mark and I got to Gimpo Airport way ahead of time. We didn’t want to be late and we had nothing better to do with our time. Besides, I love hanging out at airports. We checked in at JejuAir.

You’re too big, bag.

I noticed the very tiny sized baggage restriction demo near the counter. I placed my backpack on the demo and saw that my backpack was more than twice its size. I asked the lady at the luggage check-in if I could carry my bag on. She said it was okay.

There was no way to get my bag to fit in the overhead compartment. Mark shoved it under the seats in front of us. It took up the space meant for 2 carry-on bags. (My backpack is considered to be a small backpacking rucksack and I always use it as a carry-on.)

oh yeah, Josie is not my real name…

조씨

When it was time to go through security, I noticed that my name was misspelled. My real first name is J-O-S-E-P-H-I-N-E. My nickname is J-O-S-I-E. My ticket said, “J-O-S-I-E-P-H-I-N-E” with the last 5 letters written in pen and a stamp above it. I looked at the ticket and giggled. “They wrote my name wrong.” I guess the security lady heard me, because she scrutinized the ticket and would not let me pass.

I went back to the ticket counter to get my ticket reprinted. The lady at the counter could not see the difference. She kept looking at my passport then at the ticket. I had to point the mistake out to her.

“Oh,” she said, then pressed the print button on her keyboard. I thought it would come out with my name correctly spelled on the ticket. It still said J-O-S-I-E. Then the lady took out her pen and crossed out the I-E and wrote E-P-H-I-N-E. The ticket was then topped off with a tiny blue stamp.

Once past the first stage of security check, we moved on to the x-ray scans and the metal detectors. I got through just fine. Mark was stopped. He had forgotten that he had 2 cigarette lighters in his backpack. One guard told him, “lighter.”

Mark: “Oh, I can’t bring a lighter?”

Guard: “No, 2 lighters. One okay”

Mark handed the guard one of his lighters. So I guess bringing flammable liquids on a plane is okay as long as you just have one container.

Would anyone care for a drink of water?

OOoooo It’s so MysTerioS

On our first day on Jeju we visited first the Mysterious Road then Love Land. Love Land was great. As expected there were lots of ajumas (older ladies) and ajusshis (male counterparts of the ajuma) pointing at things, giggling at things, and yanking on things. They get so scandalized, but they just can’t look away.

The Mysterious road, however was a bit of a let down, but still okay-I-guess.

All Pictures


South Korea
(대한민국)

How to get there:

  • You can enter by plane, boat, or train, though entry by train is rare if not damn impossible for most non-presidents of North or South Korea.
  • Most citizens from many countries do not need to get a visa before going to South Korea.
  • People of most nationalities will get a 90-day visa at the airport or ferry port.
  • To be completely sure, check with the Korean embassy in your country.

Phone:

Website:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Korea is a generally safe country. You don’t really have to watch out for pickpockets,muggers, or scam artists.
    • You should watch out when crossing the streets, beware of scooters on the sidewalk, and the little old ladies that will push you to get that last seat on the bus or subway.
  • Use common sense and you will be okay.
  • Things are generally inexpensive and there are many wonderful things to buy.

Enjoy Korea! I live there for 2 years and had a fantastic time.


Jeju Island
(제주도)

How to get there:

  • 33°30’26.8″N 126°29’32.8″E

From Seoul or Incheon:

  • By BoatfromthePortofIncheon
    • Depending on the time of year the fare to Jeju by boat will be cheaper than flying. But for us, traveling in the non-peak season for air travel, it was almost double the price of a cheap flight.
    • Cost: about 65,000KRW  one-way or more depending of the accommodations
    • Phone: 721-2173
  • ByPlanefromGimpo Airport
    • The best way to find cheap flights is to go wikipedia, look up the airport of your destination (Jeju International Airport) , find out what airlines fly there and from where. Then go down the list of airlines. Check out their website for flights costs. It doesn’t hurt to check out a few flight search engines like orbitz or priceline. We got our tickets from JejuAir with the help of a Korean speaker. They were less than 200,000KRW for 2 round trip tickets.

From outside Korea:

Notes:

  • Public transportation on Jeju Island is a real pain. Rent a car or scooter or bring a really interesting book.
  • Even though it is called the Hawaii of Korea, it is not warm there in the winter.

Gimpo Airport
(김포국제공항)

to get there:

  • 37°33’31.2″N 126°47’40.0″E

From Seoul

  • By Subway:
    • It’s easy, just go to Gimpo Airport subway station. If you live anywhere near a line 9 station, then you can take advantage of the express train to Gimpo.
  • By Bus:
    • All the airport limousine to Incheon Airport from Seoul stops at Gimpo Airport. Just look out for the bus stops with a plane on them. These buses cost 8,000KRW without a T-money card and 7,500KRW with one.

Website

Notes:

  • Gimpo Airport is not even close to being as nice as Incheon airport.
  • There is a movie theater over at the international terminal, but there is not much to do or eat once you go past the security check.
  • Make sure to eat before you go past the security check. There is a restaurant inside but every time I’ve seen it, it was either not opened yet, already closed, or there was nothing decent to eat.

Jeju City Bus Terminal
(제주종합터미널)

How to get there:

  • 33°29’58.9″N 126°30’53.7″E

From the Airport:

  • Take the #100 city bus.
  • They use the English word for “terminal” so when the stop is near you will hear the word in English.
  • You can use your T-Money card on all public buses on this island.

Address:

Jeju IntercityTerminal
2441 Ora 1-dong, Jeju City

Notes:


Yeha Guesthouse

How to get there:

  • 33°29’59.7″N 126°31’33.9″E
  • by taxi: 3 minutes from Jeju Airport (3,000KRW)
  • by bus:
    • take the #100, get off at Jeju bus terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.
  • fromJeju Port Terminal:
    • Take the #92 bus (1,000KRW),
    • get off at the Jungangno crossroads near the KB bank.
    • Then transfer to the #100 bus (1,000KRW)
    • get off at Jeju Bus Terminal.
    • From there, it is a 3 minute walk. Just go straight in the direction the bus was going.
    • You will cross a little bride.
    • After you pass the intersection after the bridge look out for the guesthouse on your right.
    • You will have to cross a parking lot to get to it.

Address:

Yeha Guesthouse 561-17, Samdo 1-dong Jeju-si, Jeju Island

Phone:

  • +82-64-713-5505

Website:

E-Mail: yehaguesthouse@hotmail.com

Notes:

  • It’s way better than staying at a love motel.
  • It comes with free breakfast,
    • free internet,
    • free wireless internet,
    • free laundry,
    • free international phone calls,
    • free use of the kitchen…
    • Most of all, it’s clean.
  • If you book your stay through hostelworld you’ll get lower rates.

Love Land
(제주러브랜드)

How to get there:

  • 33°27’05.9″N 126°29’23.9″E
  • According to the website Love Land is a 10 minutes cab ride from the airport.
  • You can also get the bus at gate 2 at the Jeju Bus Terminal (제주종합버스터미넌).

Address:

680-26, Yeon-dong
Jeju-si, Jeju-do, South Korea

Phone:

  • 82-64-712-6988

Website

Cost:

  • 7000KRW

Hours:

  • 9:00 – 0:00

Notes:

  • You must be at least 18 years old to enter.

The Mysterious Road

How to get there:

  • 33°27’02.2″N 126°29’11.4″E
  • This road is near Love Land.
  • Use the map below and directions above to get there.
  • Walk pass Love Land a bit and you can’t miss it.

Address:

Mysterious Road (Dokkaebi Road)
Nohyeong-dong, Jeju-si, Jeju-do

Phone:

  • 064-710-3312

Cost:

  • Free

Hours:

  • always available

Notes:

  • Don’t expect too much.

Map:

Posted in Jeju, Jeju City, South Korea | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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