With Backpack

One World in One Lifetime

Posts Tagged ‘The Imperial Palace East Gardens’

The Final Backpack

Posted by Heliocentrism on September 30, 2017

Tuesday, July 4th – 12th, 2017

When I was in Malaysia I bought a smaller backpack to force myself to drastically pare down my clothes and travel items. It did the trick and really helped me to decided what I really needed and what I should dump or mail back to my mom’s house. Because of if I learned to live with less and I felt lighter. But, for me to go to Iceland I would need a bag that could hold more. It didn’t need to be as big as the pack I started out with, but something between the first bag and the smaller one.

It took Mark a mere 5 minutes to pack away all his stuff in preparation for a change in hotel or a flight. I, on the other hand, took about 20 minutes. Everything in my pack had to be folded just so and packed in a certain order. Sometimes, when the zipper would not close all the way it meant that an item had been placed in up-side-down or backwards.

We were getting closer to the time when we would be in Iceland. At which point, I would have to buy a pair of jeans, a fleece jacket, and a long sleeve shirt or two. None of these new clothes would fit in this small bag. I had to get a bigger one.

I had never really gone backpack shopping with any criteria in mind. My first bag, I chose “something red”. The second one I got because it was “not red”. The third one, the one that turned out to be a bad choice, was selected because it was “small”. This time I knew what I wanted.

Must-have 1: Back Vent

I needed a back vent. Bag #2 had one. I didn’t even notice how useful it was until Mark told me that he wanted a pack with a back vent like mine. “Why does that even matter?” I asked him. He gave me his pack to carry for a while. It was a hot day and it didn’t take long to see why my bag was better.

Without the back vent, it gets really hot carrying a pack, even when it’s almost empty. The back vent keeps your back well ventilated and the sweat on your back can easily dry and keep you cool as you carry your haul.

This pack is both front and top loading

Must-have 2: Front Loading Option

I need a pack that is front loading. Bag #1 was front loading. It makes looking for things so much easier. To find stuff in a top loading backpack, one must first unpack. Completely unpacking might not be necessary; the item might be found before then.

If a pack is front loading, all you have to do to see your stuff is to unzip it. Then you can pick what you want and leave the rest in the bag.

Must-have 3: Small Size

It has to be small. I need it to function as my day pack as well as my backpack. I would put my stuff in a locker at a hostel or in a drawer at my hotel. Then I want to be able to carry around my pack as a light and small day pack.

I also have a fear of being robbed while traveling by bus. When you get on a bus, you have to place any big items you have under the bus. This is where suitcases and backpacks go. Although it has never happened to me, anyone I know, or anyone I’ve heard about my fear is this:

I place my backpack under the bus and take my seat. I’ve got a ticket to the city of Five-Hours-From-Here. The bus is so comfortable that I fall asleep. The bus stops to let off the people going to Two-Hours-From-Here. One of these passengers sees my bag and takes it.

The reason for the theft doesn’t matter. Maybe my bag is mistaken for hers. Maybe it was not stolen at all, but my bag falls out as this passenger gets her own bag. The end result is the same, my bag is no longer on the bus and I don’t notice until I get to my stop.

This can easily be prevented if my bag is small enough for me not to have to put my bag below. If it is small, I can keep it on my lap, by my feet, or above on a luggage rack. This would make me feel much safer.

Must-have 4: But, not too small

It needs to be big enough to carry all my stuff. This time, I would not rely on my memory or a label to determine if the new pack were the right size. I would bring the small bag with me to compare the two. This time there would be no mistakes.

This is just some random area of Tokyo.

Mark and I went to the Kanda district in Tokyo where many of the outdoor sporting goods stores are. We looked through 8 or 9 stores hunting for the right bag. I was worried that I would not find anything that would work for me.

Luckily, I found two packs and had a hard time choosing between the two. In the end I picked an Osprey Sirrus that had everything I wanted in a very nice color. It was a medium sized bag that can be compressed to a small size when being used as a day pack. It was not the great financial deal like Mark’s $12-pack, but I did managed to get it duty free by showing my passport. That took a good $10 off the cost of this bag. And so far, I’m very happy with it.

The smaller backpack and I did have some good times together.

The next thing I had to deal with was the fact that I had 2 backpacks. Being in Japan, one cannot simply throw it out. The small pack had to be disposed of properly.  Mark wanted to take it to a recycle shop. I thought that was a very good idea so I searched the internet for recycle shops near our hotel. We walked to several, but none of them bought backpacks.

On one of our days out and about downtown Tokyo, I thought I would try once more. I found a place near Ueno Park called Mode Off. We handed over the small pack and gave them 30 minutes to appraise it. When we returned they gave us 1,500JPY (a little less than 15USD) for it. “Not bad for a pack I paid about 30USD for,” I thought. I was expecting about 500yen.


Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • International ATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your bank to ask what ATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
    • The Post Office bank seems to work with the most international cards.
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan; I’ve never been a tourist here.)

Photo from: cometojapankuru.blogspot.jp

Backpack Shopping in Tokyo

How to get there:

Websites:

Cost:

  • It’s Tokyo and designer brands…
    • That said, things do go on sale and there are some generic brands. You just have to look a bit harder.
  • Backpack – 6,500JYN (Generic on sale) to 45,000JYN (Name brand, huge, not on sale)

Notes:

  • There are more shops in the area, but I found everything I needed (and some stuff I didn’t need, but wanted) right on this street.
  • There are a lot more outdoor goods shops in this street between the Victoria and the  ムラサキスポーツ, but they do not show up on google maps.
    • Like the really nice North Face shop in a 5 story building where most floors have 2 specialty brand stores.
  • Bring your passport to get duty free.
    • You will not have to pay the 8% tax.
    • Don’t forget to ask about a duty free option if the clerk forgets to ask you.

Tokyo Imperial Palace
(皇居)
(Kōkyo)

&

The Imperial Palace East Gardens
(皇居東御苑)
(Kōkyo Higashi Gyoen)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°41’06.6″N 139°45’10.0″E (Tokyo Imperial Palace)
  • Coordinates 35°41’10.5″N 139°45’33.8″E (The Imperial Palace East Gardens)

Address:

1-1 ChiyodaChiyoda, Tokyo Prefecture 100-0001Japan

Phone:

  • +81 3-3213-1111

Websites:

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

The Imperial Palace East Gardens:

  • 9:00 – 16:00
  • Cosed Every Monday and Friday

Image result for mode off ueno

Photo from: secondhand-clothing-tokyo.blogspot.jp

Mode Off Ueno

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35.708114, 139.773905

Address:

  • Japan, 〒110-0005 Tōkyō-to, Taitō-ku, 台東区Ueno, 4 Chome−4−2−3

Phone:

  • +81 3-5807-7330

Websites:

Hours:

  • 11:00 – 21:00

Notes:

  • This store and others like it are part of the Hard Off Group, which sells (and buys) used goods.
    • Hard Off – Electronics, Music, Instruments, Software…
    • Mode Off – Clothes, Bags, Purses…
    • Off House – Home appliances, Furniture, Clothes…
    • Garage Off – Big Electronics/ Appliances, Stuff you would put in a garage…
    • Book Off – Books, Music, Software…
    • Hobby Off – Toys, collections, Cards…
    • Liquor Off – Pre-owned but un-used booze…

Sogenji Temple
(Kappa-dera temple)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35.715157, 139.786291

Address:

  • Japan, 〒111-0036 Tōkyō-to, Taitō-ku, Matsugaya, 3 Chome−7 松が谷3-7-2

Phone:

  • +81 3-3841-2035

Websites:

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

  • 9am – 5pm

Notes:

  • The shrine is very small.
  • If you encounter a kappa, don’t panic.
    • Bow to the kappa.
    • The dim-witted kappa will bow to you in return.
    • This will cause the bowl on the kappa’s head to spill it’s water.
    • If the kappa’s head bowl is void of water for too long, the kappa will die.
    • This will make the kappa run to the nearest body of water, leaving you alone and unharmed.
    • Never follow the kappa to the water!

Kaneiji
(Science Bug Temple)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35.721179, 139.774144

Address:

  • Japan, 〒110-0002 Tōkyō-to, Taitō-ku, Uenosakuragi, 1 Chome−14−11

Phone:

  • +81 3-3821-4440

Websites:

Notes:

  • There is a tomb for bugs who have died in the name of science.

Map:

Posted in Japan, Tokyo 都 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Impossible of a Visit

Posted by Heliocentrism on March 6, 2015

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

All Pictures

Typical Japan during a holiday…

The impossibilities are endless!

Well, I didn’t expect everything that we planned to see this day to be open. Somethings I knew would be closed, even before we got to Tokyo, and had expected to view only from afar. What I didn’t expect were things like high walls blocking my view of imperial flowers.

It looks like he’s traveling alone.

The Yasukuni Shrine was a 30 minute stroll from our hostel. So, we got up early and ate cereal before heading out. We passed by the Yushukan War Museum first. There we were greeted by a sign telling everyone that the museum was closed and we should come back after the winter break. “When exactly do they expect  working people to come visit this thing?”

Then we went to the museum’s accompanying shrine. It was very shrine like; nothing over-the-top special about it. We could tell that the real festivities would not happen until New Year’s eve night. But we came to say, we saw the shrine that everyone gets all upset about when the Prime Minister of Japan visits. That was really the most interesting thing about this shrine.

There are some amazing gardens across the moat and on the other side of that wall.

We walked towards the Imperial Palace Gardens. It’s open whenever the Emperor is not in residence. People walk the gardens to relax and some even run there to train for the many marathons in Japan. But, Emperor Akihito always spends New Year’s day with his family at this palace.

I thought we could walk around it and look towards that general direction and maybe glimpse some trees or something.

Nope.

I guess we could have come back on New Year’s day and stood in line out in the cold with millions of other people to hope for a chance to see the emperor waving at everyone from a balcony. But, crowds, the cold, and waiting are three of my least favorite things.

For a split second I thought the crowd meant that it was open.

We came upon a small crowd of people walking around the entrance to the Imperial Palace. I knew the palace should be closed, but there was a crowd. Maybe they knew something I didn’t.

Mark and I walked all the way to the main gate, which was really far away from were we first saw the crowd. There were clumps of people walking up to the gate to read the sign saying that the palace was closed. That’s why you should never follow a crowd!

The future is here.

Next we went to the Nakagin Capsule Tower where we stood on the side walk and took photos. There was no way for us to get in. To discourage anyone from asking to be let inside, they put up a sign on the door that said, “This building is impossible of a visit.”

Well, that ends that.

I tried to get a photo of a selfie stick in action.

Now for things that are open.

Next we took the subway to Sensoji Temple (also known as Asakusa Temple). This temple, like most temples, is never closed for holidays. And this particular temple is always crowded.

A student of mine and me at Asakusa temple in 2006.

This was actually the very first temple I had ever visited. Back in 2006 when I first moved to Japan and worked for GEOS, a company that has since gone bankrupt, two of my students took me to see it. I told them that I hadn’t seen much of Tokyo besides the many times I had been there for business meetings that GEOS forced be to go to.

Two of my adult students took it upon themselves to show me a little of Tokyo. I don’t remember much of what we saw that day other than this temple. It really impressed me. I took everyone who visited me that year to this temple.

I would drink tea everyday if I lived here.

We then walked around looking for what Mark called, “stupid tea cups”. I liked it and really wanted to see the giant tea cups in person. Mark was unimpressed.

The shop that the tea cups advertised was open and they even had a sale going on, but we didn’t care about going in. I didn’t want to find some fragile thing, like a tea cup or kettle, that I really liked only to have to carry it around the rest of the day.

Let’s see a tower!

Next we went to see Asahi’s Golden Turd. The building was closed. Mark stood on the steps wishing for beer and cursing the Tokyo gods. “The stupid tea cups shop is open, but this, this you close!?”

Once he stopped weeping, we walk towards Tokyo Skytree. Since the day was filled with so much disappointment Mark was determined to go up the Skytree, if it was open.

I’m too disgusted by the long line to smile.

It was. But everyone and their mom was in line hoping to buy tickets before it closed. Later, we talked to some people staying at our hostel who went up the Skytree. They wasted a whole day to buy tickets to go up only to spend about 30 minutes up there before getting bored.

I didn’t have the heart to tell them that if they were willing to pay about 8USD more, they could have taken their passports and gotten the special foreigners’ Fast Ticket and skip the line entirely.

I didn’t feel like dropping ¥2,820 on the Skytree, when we could go to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building for free. Rather than tell Mark this out right and start an argument, I suggested checking out Tokyo Tower first, then seeing which tower we would rather go up.

Tokyo Tower: The Eiffel Tower, only smaller and more orange

After seeing Tokyo Tower, it was clear that Tokyo Skytree was better. Tokyo Tower’s tickets were cheaper and it had shorter lines, but the Skytree was more exciting. Mark concluded that if we were going to see one of these towers, we should see the other one, but not today.

How can we be at a subway station and still completely lost!?

Negotiating the subway in Tokyo when you still don’t have the hang of it is stressful and tiring. It also takes so long to figure out what to do.

There is free wi-fi at most of the subway stations in Tokyo and navigation apps help a lot. We were doing great until my tablet’s battery died. There are no charging areas at any of the stations.

Once we had to figure things out by looking at a map, we lost interest in sightseeing. It’s that damn confusing! (At least at first.)

By the end of the next day we figured out how the whole thing worked and stopped using the apps to get to places. But by the evening of this day we had had enough.

Subway adjacent food

It took us so long to find the right station on the correct line to take us back to our hostel, that we chose what restaurant to patronize based on its proximity to said station.

Unlike other subway systems in other cities, in Tokyo you can be at point A and station A wanting to go to point B near station B and have no way of doing that. Sometimes, you have to go above ground and walk to another line because there are no transfers between the line you are on and the line you need to get to.

Later we chose where we wanted to go based on whether they were on one of the Toei Lines or Tokyo Metro Lines. Then we stuck to either Toei or Tokyo Metro Lines for the whole day. It just made life easier.

All Pictures


 

Japan
(日本)
(Nippon)

How to get there:

You can enter Japan by plane or boat. Though, the number of boats going to Japan from other countries has gone down significantly.

Americans get 90-day visas to Japan at the port of entry. Check with your nearest Japanese embassy or consulate for visa information.

Phone:

Website:

Downloads:

Videos:

Books:

Notes:

  • Be careful what over the counter drugs you bring into Japan.  Actifed, Sudafed, Vicks inhalers, and Codeine are prohibited.
  • InternationalATMs are really hard to find; more so if you aren’t in a big city. Many places in Japan do not use credit cards. Take cash and call your bank to ask whatATMs or banks in Japan will work with your cash card.
    • ATMs have opening hours. Usually 9:00-18:00 (They have better work hours than most business men and women here.)
    • The Post Office bank seems to work with the most international cards.
  • You can get a Japan Railway, pass which saves you a lot of money on the trains, but you can only buy it before you get to Japan and you cannot be a resident of Japan. (I don’t have more information about it because I’ve only ever lived in Japan; I’ve never been a tourist here.)

Ace Inn Shinjuku

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°41’32.2″N 139°43’22.3″E
  • near Akebonobashi station ontheToeiShinjuku line
    • Exit #3

Address:

〒160-0001 東京都新宿区片町5-2

Phone:

Websites:

Cost:

  • ¥3,300 ~ 4,500 per person per night

Hours:

  • Check in 16:00
  • Check out 11:00
  • There is a receptionist available 24 hours a day.

Notes:

  • The wi-fi is pretty decent throughout the whole hostel.
  • There is one parking space. (You can see our white k-car in the photo above.)
    • ¥1,000/ night
  • My Hostelworld review:

“Tokyo is expensive, so I can’t expect too much from a budget hostel. The place was clean enough for the most part. My bed, sheets, and towels looked pretty clean, but I did get run over by a huge roach in the common area. The kitchen is quite small, and dirty looking. Because the place looks a bit run down in the lobby, some travelers don’t make as much of an effort to pick up after themselves as they should. But, if you just want to stay for a night or two this place might be okay.”


It’s about to get real!

Tokyo Subway
(東京の地下鉄)
(Tōkyō no chikatetsu)

How to get there:

Phone:

  • 0120-104106 Customer Service (Japanese Only)
  • 03-3834-5577 Lost and Found
    • Lost property is kept at in Ueno Station’s (Hibiya Line) Lost & Found Center (across from the pass office) or 3-4 days.

Websites:

Apps:

Downloads:

Cost:

Hours:

  • 5:00 – 0:00 (actual time varies from station to station)
  • The trains run later on some holidays.
  • Rush hour:
    • 7:30-930
    • 17:30-19:30

Notes:

  • Getting to the Airport
  • Special Cars and Rules
    • Some cars are only for women (and children under 12) during the rush hours.
    • No eating or drinking.
    • Don’t put luggage on the seat beside you.
    • Do not talk loudly or make too much noise.
  • If you’re having trouble remembering what line you need, just remember the first letter of the line’s name. For most of the lines a tourist will use, the line’s symbol will be the same as the first letter of the line’s name.
    • This is not true for all the lines of the Tokyo subway system, just the ones mostly used by tourists.
  • There is a steep learning curve. At first the Tokyo Subways system will confuse you, especially when you compare it to more logically planned subway systems like that of Seoul or London. But you will get a hang of it.
    • The subway is actually run by 2 companies, Toei and Tokyo Metro.
      • Be careful when buying a day pass.
    • The train, and monorail are also separate from the subway system.
    • I have never used the bus in Tokyo and cannot give any advice on that.
  • The Suica card can only be used to ride the JR Railway.

Map:


Tokyo Imperial Palace
(皇居)
(Kōkyo)

&

The Imperial Palace East Gardens
(皇居東御苑)
(Kōkyo Higashi Gyoen)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°41’06.6″N 139°45’10.0″E (Tokyo Imperial Palace)
  • Coordinates 35°41’10.5″N 139°45’33.8″E (The Imperial Palace East Gardens)

Address:

1-1 Chiyoda, Chiyoda, Tokyo Prefecture 100-0001, Japan

Phone:

  • +81 3-3213-1111

Websites:

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

The Imperial Palace East Gardens:

  • 9:00 – 16:00
  • Mondays, Fridays, New Year (Dec 28 to Jan 3)

Yasukuni Shrine
(靖国神社)
(Yasukuni Jinja)

&

Yushukan War Memorial Museum
(遊就館)
(Yūshūkan)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°41’38.6″N 139°44’37.8″E

Address:

3-1-1 Kudan-kita, Chiyoda, Tokyo Prefecture 102-8246, Japan

Phone:

  • +81 3-3261-8326

Websites:

Cost:

Shrine:

  • free

Museum:

  • 800 yen

Hours:

Shrine:

  • 6:00 – 18:00

Museum:

  • 9:00 – 16:30
  • A few irregular closure days in late June and late December

Nakagin Capsule Tower
(中銀カプセルタワー)
(Nakagin Kapuseru Tawā)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°39’56.1″N 139°45’48.2″E

Address:

中銀本社ビル中銀カプセルタワービル
〒104-0061 Tōkyō-to, Chūō-ku, Ginza,
8 Chome−16−10

Websites:

Cost:

  • Free to look at from the street.

Hours:

  • Always available to look at from the street.

Notes:

  • There is no way to get inside to look around, unless you’re paying to spend the night.
  • There are many rumors that this building will be torn down soon. But, these rumors started in 2007, so…

Sensō-ji
(浅草寺)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°42’53.0″N 139°47’47.7″E

Address:

2-3-1 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Phone:

  • +81 3-3842-0181

Websites:

Cost:

  • free

Hours:

  • 6:00 – 17:00

Notes:

  • Sensoji Temple is the oldest temple in Tokyo.
  • Sometimes referred to as the temple near Asakusa.

Niimi Head & Teacups
(ニイミ洋食器店)
(Nīimi Yōshokkiten)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°42’38.0″N 139°47’17.1″E

Address:

1 Chome-11 Matsugaya, Taito, Tokyo

Phone:

Websites:

Cost:

  • It’s actually a shop.

Hours:

  • The shop’s hours are 10:00 – 18:00
  • Closed Sundays

Notes:

  • The head and teacups are advertisements for a shop that sell table and kitchen ware.

The Asahi Beer Hall 
(スーパードライホール)
(Super Dry Hall)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°42’35.4″N 139°48’01.1″E

Address:

1, 1 Chome-23-1 Azumabashi, Sumida, Tokyo

Phone:

  • +81 3-5608-5111

Websites:

Hours:

  • 11:30 – 23:00 for Flamme d’Or,
  • 10:00 – 21:00 for Asahi Sky Room

Notes:

  • The gold thing on the top of the building is supposed to be the ‘burning heart of Asahi beer’ and a frothy head.
    • But, most people refer to it as “the golden turd” (kin no unko, 金のうんこ) and the Asahi Beer Hall itself as “poo building” (unko-biru, うんこビル).
  • Apparently, it’s not a bad place to get a beer and a view of Tokyo.
  • There are several restaurants in the building.

Tokyo Sky Tree
(東京スカイツリ)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°42’36.1″N 139°48’38.5″E

Address:

1 Chome-1-2 Oshiage, Sumida, Tokyo 131-0045

Phone:

  • +81 570-55-0634

Websites:

Cost:

  • Online Ticket Purchase (Japanese Only)
  • TEMBO DECK (350m)
    • maximum of 10,000 tickets per day
    • ¥2,060 – no time assignment
    • ¥2,570 – day/time assigned
  • TEMBOGALLERIA (450m)
    • additional ¥1,030
  • Skytree Fast Tickets
    • Show your passport to be able to purchase this ticket. (Japanese Citizens accompanying a foreign tourist may also buy this ticket.)
    •  ¥2,820
    • This ticket allows you to skip the line.

Hours:

  • 8:00 – 20:30

Notes:

  • The tower is expensive and crowed. I preferred going to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building. It’s free and has a great view of Tokyo Skytree.

Tokyo Tower
(東京タワー)

How to get there:

  • Coordinates 35°39’30.9″N 139°44’43.6″E

Address:

4 Chome-2-8 Shibakoen, Minato, Tokyo 105-0011

Phone:

  • +81 3-3433-5111

Websites:

Cost:

  • main observation deck (150m) – ¥900
  • Special observation deck (250m) – an additional ¥700

Hours:

  • 9:00 – 21:30

Notes:

  • The tower is not as expensive as Tokyo Skytree but, just as crowed. I preferred going to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building. It’s free and has a great view of both Tokyo Skytree and Tokyo Tower.

Map:

Posted in Honshū, Japan, Tokyo 都 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: